WordPress Superuser Training Materials now Open Source on GitHub

Adding to the previous resources and presentations we’ve released to Documattic, our GitHub repository, we’re happy to release what we think will be a valuable resource for the WordPress community at-large: the WordPress.com VIP Superuser Training course!

The Superuser Training course is aimed at site administrators, site owners, editors, and trainers for large or multi-author sites:

In this course, the participant will learn how to manage and use the WordPress interface from a site owner’s point of view; as someone who will be managing multiple users, their permissions, and ultimately sharing knowledge with them about how to use WordPress to publish a great site with an active community and/or audience. We like to think of this course as teaching your teachers – those who will serve as the WordPress experts in an organization.

The course also does a deep dive into the publishing process so superusers can teach their editors, authors, and contributors how to best use the WordPress interface. From creating and publishing posts to managing tags and categories, from mastering multimedia and images in articles, and bulk management of posts and pages, it’ll cover the entire publishing process from draft to done.

Previously, the Superuser Training course was only presented to VIP clients and partners who took the in-person course taught by VIP instructors during our VIP Training Days, which we’ve done in San Francisco, New York, Toronto, and London, and will continue to do. We’re open sourcing the Superuser Training slides to the community in the hope that any enterprise, WordPress agency, or in-house trainer can take advantage of them as a resource.

The more than 300 slides, including some exercises for students to do directly during the course, are available on GitHub and are released with reveal.js. This means that the HTML version can be presented from any browser, regardless of operating system, and the presentation can be updated by anyone knowing HTML. A brief note about usage to the instructor accompanies an index of the major topics covered in the full-day training course, with accompanying slide numbers so they can be quickly accessed.

An important note: these training materials are not meant to be self-paced or solo training materials. They are meant to be presented by an instructor and additional value-add will be given to the participants through thoughtful explanations and demos as needed.

WordPress.com VIP Superuser Training Slides on GitHub

We’d like the content to continue to improve and grow. If you have additional sections to add, updated screenshots to swap in, or other improvements, feel free to make alterations via pull-request. Like all content on Documattic, the content is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0) license. Check out the Superuser Training course at Documattic on GitHub.

Which WordPress resources or materials should we make available next on GitHub? 

Metro UK’s Powerful Content Algorithm – Now With Full Transcript

At our first London WordPress Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup,  Dave Jensen (@elgrom) from Metro UK (hosted right here on WordPress.com VIP) explained how Metro continually experiments with their content algorithm to promote and feature the most interesting content for their readers and increase engagement on their site and mobile apps.

Dave recently shared some insight on how Metro UK has grown 350% through some growth hack experiments, so he provides another great inside look on what Metro has been doing internally to tweak their site content.

Below is his slide deck and the video from his presentation which we’ve shared previously, and we’re publishing it again now with full transcript below. 

Welcome, I’m Dave Jensen, I’m the head of development for Metro UK. We’ve been a WordPress VIP client since about December 2012. I think we’re one of the larger enterprise, largest publishers in the UK that use WordPress VIP.

So we’ve been playing around with all sorts of different crazy ways of interacting with our content for the last while, when we first released, we had this whole swipe based interaction that we’d been using which was fun to build, a little bit too complicated. Over the last while, we’ve been playing around with how we could automate some of the placement of stuff on the page so, our algorithms.

We’re a pretty lean operation. Maybe some of you won’t see this as lean but for big publishers there’s 6 developers, 20 people writing content all the time. We have a 24/7 mindset though, so we have champagne aspirations on a beer budget. We’re always doing constant experimentations of how a development process works.

We’ve kind of gone through a process of building something around some kind of trending content and we’ve kind of stretched that out into a kind of newsfeed and this is what we’ll go through today.

How can we do something clever and combine those into something that we might be able to move up the page and take over?

So basically we started collecting a whole bunch of data sources just to begin with, it started as one of our guys needed a dissertation project. So we grabbed a lot of data from Facebook, shares likes, comments, grabbed some information from Twitter, from Omniture, which is our analytics and from WordPress, so we can kind of build everything together.

We took all this data and stuck it in MySQL, then we started doing some pretty basic calculations on that. I wanted to keep everything really simple, so the feedback loops that we could have from everyone involved, they could all feel part of this process and having them engaged with us, is gonna give us a lot of benefit.

Because you know, with running some crazy big data thing, and nobody understands what we’re doing, they can’t tell me when I’m doing something wrong – which is really often. So basically we took the views, we took the social interactions and we times it by a multiplier, we get a score.

We ran this every half an hour and every half an hour, we took this one from the previous one and it kind of gave us a rate of change, a number that is going on. When we released the new site, we were lucky enough to convince the editorial team to stick this at the top, second thing down on the homepage, underneath their thing.

It might sound funny, but editorial people are usually pretty protective around what they put on their homepage, this was a reasonably large step for them at the time.

We also kind of snuck in our sidebar program, so we were pretty interested to see the top bit here. It’s how the trending stuff does the bottom bit is kind of how the clicks on the top stuff work.

We were pretty interested to see that even without all the images, having it text based underneath that there was a real pretty similar level of interaction between the two modules. So we thought we’d probably stumbled across something which was interesting and seemed to jive with our users.

They also changed 24/7 without anybody from our team kind of having to touch it, which was quite nice, so on a Sunday morning, before anyone was in the office, that was still reasonably fresh.

It also, from a commercialization point of view, gave us a way of promoting native content and some kind of native display units to hopefully play around making some more money. ‘Cause it’s always nice to do that.

So from that, when we removed swipe from the site, it was far too complicated, we went down kind of a hole, we started playing with a stream of news. At the bottom of the homepage we just grabbed the latest posts and we put them in a kind of you know page, infinite scroll-type approach.

This got quite a high level, we were really surprised even that the bottom of the homepage, kind of screw it away, at the number of interactions that were getting within this.

There were a lot of people kind of scrolling, playing, clicking around, from that we thought well we kind of have this trending stuff at the top, which is doing quite interesting and we have all these people clicking on these kind of lists down here at the bottom.

How can we do something clever and combine those into something that we might be able to move up the page and take over?

So the timeline is pretty straightforward, it’s just kind of sets the thing. The interesting thing was that we took the information that we calculated and put that back into WordPress to be post meta data and then we used that information to style the front end.

So the big image over there was something that was within the trending, the second one down was just normal one and the one at the bottom was something that had been promoted by an editor.

The neat thing was there was a high-level of consistency across all the platforms. We have a responsive site and it worked quite well.

We were kind of like, even just within a normal time-based feed, we were using the data that we had to change the appearance to give the stuff that was popular a larger percentage of screen time, even in something which was time-based.

Then we started playing around with some advertising and things that looked less like advertising and more fit into the style of the site. The neat thing was there was a high-level of consistency across all the platforms, we have a responsive site, it worked quite well. We were playing around with that and we spent lots of time optimizing it and all the graphs went like that which was pretty neat, so I was enjoying myself on that.

The next kind of phase of this was you know, when we were playing around with the trending stuff, it was great but recency was a real problem that we had. Cause you know, you had to get all the data to the point and then it was what was the biggest one between them.

So we had to come up with a simple calculation to you know call that up and so we just introduced a coefficient to that, to kind of give it a shape and boost things up, which were very early on, to allow to give them a bit of airtime and get them closer to the top of the streams.

So add a coefficient to the end and just by taking that, and giving it a score with the coefficient, we built something which seems to get a, seems to be performing pretty well.

We’ve been optimizing that in quite a high-level gain and you have some graphs going up, so the scrolls and clicks. First of all we track a lot of information, so you can see down at the bottom, from going to timelines when we started to newsfeed version to infinite. Each one of those had a gradual increase.

Our statistics, some of the biggest learnings that we’ve had is because we have such variable traffic numbers.

In order to figure out actually what’ going on, we had to break everything down per daily active user which was a kind of,it was a bit one of those moments, like “why didn’t I do this before”?

Because it’s just a kind of number, we can say “hey, you like news or sports”, give them another 5,000 views and the things you read are much more likely to be closer to the top.

When we moved from a time-based feed to a news-based feed, clicks increased by 9 percent across the board, which we’re quite happy with. This has allowed us to kind of take over the homepage and it’s kind of the third thing down.

We’ve been A/B testing and content density, is one of the things we’re moving towards kind of increasing the content density, even more things on the page…more opportunities to click, more people click.

Infinite scroll had a pretty big impact as well because if you stop content then people leave and they don’t have the opportunity to click. Then we would get some good clicks on our native display and the content drivers to native content.

Some of the lessons learned…Content volume is a big problem and kind of a bit of a beast that you keep on feeding and if you don’t feed it or you give it too much of the same type of content, I get complaints, because then it kind of looks clustered within that.

Because we’re running on a scale, we’ve had some pretty fun times with MySQL and Cloudfront. Making sure we cut all of the caches at the highest level, so kind of cutting it at a category level and not playing around with it too much beneath that has allowed us to keep that going, keeping everything fast. The faster things load, the less people notice that and they click.

The common understanding has definitely helped us get feedback throughout that. so some of the things we learned from a WordPress point of view.

So we’ve been using this VIP caching thing to be able to grab the first page of information and make it kind of available and part of the page rather than having to go into it grab via ajax.

That’s the third thing that, down on the homepage. If something falls over, making it always there is good otherwise I get shouted at.

We have also with the API, we built, we actually mimicked the public API’s format,so we can kind of interchangeably use our API versus the kind of latest public API stuff, which is probably one of the quite nice hacks that we did. We were playing around with storing lots of stuff in large options for a while but that didn’t scale very well and we were using post-meta to store information.

We’ve also been playing around with CHEEZETEST to kind of give us the kind of A/B testing results but it can add quite a lot of complication if you’re trying to test too much with it.

So we took a kind of microservice architecture approach to this. We kind of have a service for data mining, a service for the newsfeed, a service for the commercial feed, which keeps all the services quite nicely separated.

We’ve been using Backbone for the templates and Cloudfront for our caching. We’ve also plugged it into an Android app, that we’ve built which has been quite fun which is just a top 10 stories on the site any one time. We are been able to pass in the channels people read and give them a boost up.

Because it’s just a kind of number, we can say hey, you like news or sports, give them another 5,000 views and the things you read are much more likely to be closer to the top.

Of the thing which would be fun, a few installs to that marketing still, the biggest fun challenge we’re having with that… and right on the money, thank you for listening.

To see the presentations from previous Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetups, click hereFor Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup groups in other cities, see the full list on VIP Events and join your local group. 

Austin Smith on Elastic Search on WordPress.com – Now With Full Transcript

Austin Smith is a managing partner at Alley Interactive, a VIP Featured Partner Agency. At our August Big Media Meetup, he gave a short “flash talk” on Elastic Search on WordPress.com in Action, which we’ve shared previously, and we’re publishing it again now with full transcript below. You can read more about the VIP Search Add-On here, and see it in action at KFF.org.

My name is Austin Smith, I’m a partner at a consulting firm called Alley Interactive, and my main project there is for the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF), for whom I’m a developer. We went live on VIP in May – feels like so long ago. So what Elastic Search does for KFF is it replaces WordPress core search wholesale and it replaces the technology they were using before which was Google custom search clients.

Using a JSN on their new site would have been really tricky because of the nested nature of the data that we migrated for them and it also just wouldn’t surface as much information as they wanted to surface. They do facets, kind of, but it’s hard. Working with the team of VIP, we built it on Elastic Search, which has tremendous ability to filter, facet and limit.

So the search bar being bold and prominent, if you’re going to have a search bar that big, you should probably have the search engine that’s that good.

So this is the default site service screen. Another cool thing we were able to do was to quickly build other kinds of pages, things you would normally use a WordPress loop for, maybe, we were able to swap in Elastic Search so now you have a loop with facets, which is really a cool way to browse a website. Sites like Amazon.com have been doing it for years; using facets on the left panel to filter down.

We were able to swap in Elastic Search so now you have a loop with facets, which is really a cool way to browse a website.

With Elastic Search, you can run a search that has no keyword and maybe doesn’t even look like a search and we took that to an even further level by making it power the “Also of interest” spots on article pages and it took some tweaking, but we have it working pretty effectively and I’ll show you in the code that generates that, it’s actually really slick. So I’m going to break into my browser here.

So the search bar being bold and prominent, if you’re going to have a search bar that big, you should probably have the search engine that’s that good. They (KFF) write up about healthcare topics, so I’m going to search for “affordable care” and I get a ton of results and it comes back pretty quickly. So we’re doing a lot here: Date filtering – you can specify one or the other or both, Topics – that’s their word for category, they banished the word category from the entire site.

Filtering it is pretty fast. Tags – same things and there are a lot of tags, so we built an expander widget and it ranks them and then Content type, which became kind of an interesting topic for us. Whereas, generally when we had previously architectured a WordPress site, we would have decided what content types to deploy based on shared functionality and we would have used categories and tags to differentiate between them in the site hierarchy.

But in this case, we knew we could get a free facet out of this so we made different content types do the same thing, so that they could have their own facets. They think of their documents, like even if it’s a report, this kind of report is an issue brief, that kind of report is a poll finding and this kind of report is a factsheet. And then they’re all supposed to be called a report.

We could have had one content type, but instead we have four. But I think it’s easier for them to use on the backend, because they know what kind each thing is and it’s much easier on the front end, for them anyway, I don’t know how many other people know the difference between an issue brief and a factsheet, they do.

We also built one other thing for them, right into the search engine. It’s here; I didn’t even have to search for anything else. This is sort of like Google AdWords where they can sponsor their own search results and drive you down a path they think might be more useful. So, if you search for “teens”, well they don’t use the word teens, they use the word adolescents and it will suggest you search for adolescent. So that’s the site’s main search.

This is just like one giant search engine query right here, it’s all Elastic Search.

But there are a number of sections in the site and a lot of them have their own search engine. “State Health Facts” – I’ll show you what this would have looked like on the main site section.  We broke out the result into everything and then “Health Facts”, which are collections of data about healthcare in the United States and around the world which resulted in graphs and maps, giant tables of data and there are about a 1,000 of them and they match just a ton of common keywords, ’cause they’re about common health topics, so they all wanted that in there. They also don’t look as nice because they don’t have the teaser. And then slides, there are like tens of thousands of slides and they just don’t want those to be in the same thing.

Again, because of the control we have here, we’re able to separate out the interface based on each tab and I don’t know if VIP knows we’re doing this, maybe I shouldn’t tell you. Every time you load a search page, it does three Elastic Search queries, the second two by AJAX, because the tabs have counts, so the global results, the global steady data that has to go back to Elastic Search and say “well, if I were to search for this, how many would I get” and it’s pretty fast, I don’t notice them coming in, it’s almost instant. So then if I were to search “health reform”, this specific search engine, it takes me back to the main site search but with a particular facet turned on, the further example of that is in this slide search engine here, this is just like one giant search engine query right here, it’s all Elastic Search.

Working with the team of VIP, we built it on Elastic Search, which has tremendous ability to filter, facet and limit.

I think this is particularly funny. The one thing on their site that looks kind of like a blog is the “Perspectives”, it’s a column which their CEO writes and it’s also powered by Elastic Search, so I think we’re maybe using the loop in a couple places but I couldn’t tell you where. If you click into a Perspective here, you’d see the “also of interest” is again dynamically generated by Elastic Search, not in real time, because nothing changes that fast, it’s all cached. The way that we do “also of interest”, which I think is the coolest bit of code you can do with Elastic Search that you can’t really do with a conventional database is we take taxonomies in priority order and then we take tags in priority order. You’ll notice this is not the standard WordPress taxonomy widget, these are re-orderable drop downs.

The tags are here, it’s an autocomplete field, but you can’t add a new tag, they don’t want you to be able to add a new tag, they actually have a taxonomy committee that approves changes. I’m not kidding. Taxonomy committees are great, they’re very very helpful. We’re basically using the term order column, which is already in the WordPress schema, to store the order of every individual taxonomy term, which allows us to send it to Elastic Search in that order and the code to do it is actually very small very elegant. It’s this here: Takes the terms with the post, it does some sort of building an array before this that I won’t show you because you’ve all seen the add something to an array operator.

But the actual query here is this “should” thing, I’m going to give you a list of things that would be cool if they matched and match as many of them and return result in the order of as many of them match, I’m sending you category with an id and tag with an id, and another tag with an id. It’s going to return a match for all 3 first and then a match for the category and the first tag second and the category in the second, third. That’s a big reason why they control their taxonomy so tightly because if they had people adding terms left and right, this would stop being useful because you’d end up with posts with a tag, and it’s the only post with that tag.

The actual search configuration, also pretty simple, this we had to do a lot of background on. VIP wrote a wrapper for the Elastic Search API, we wrote a wrapper for VIP’s wrapper and the result of it is this: which we can use to create a search engine of a given URL by saying “set default, we’re telling our plug in, we want to use this configuration for the core site search. So if you search using a WordPress search mechanism, it’s going to use this. Not in the admin area yet but we’d like to do that too, because it would be very helpful for their administrators.

And then for taxonomies it’s this easy, so we can do some really fast facet configuration, but to add another search engine, it’s that simple, so this creates a search engine that uses search, each search engine is affiliated with a post, because they could have like a teaser, like use this search engine to find XYZ, and then a set up of the facets like news posts get daily news tags and that much code is as much as it takes to create this entire search engine and we had to make it that abstract because I only had 13 minutes.

See the presentations from previous Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetups. For Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup groups in other cities, see the full list on VIP Events and join your local group. 

Want more information about WordPress services for media or enterprise sites? Get in touch.

Building community at TheBlaze.com – Big Media & Enterprise Meetup New York

Kenton Jacobsen from The Blaze presented “Building community at TheBlaze.com” at the recent Big Media & Enterprise Meetup in New York City.

View the presentation slides below:


See the presentations from previous Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetups. For Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup groups in other cities, see the full list on VIP Events and join your local group. 

Want more information about WordPress services for media or enterprise sites? Get in touch.

USA Today’s World Cup and WordPress.com VIP – Big Media & Enterprise Meetup New York

Ephraim Gregor from USA Today presented “World Cup and WordPress.com VIP”  at the recent Big Media & Enterprise Meetup in New York City.

View the presentation slides below:

See the presentations from previous Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetups. For Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup groups in other cities, see the full list on VIP Events and join your local group. 

Want more information about WordPress services for media or enterprise sites? Get in touch.

Edelman: Activating a Global Workforce of Bloggers – Big Media & Enterprise Meetup New York

Jon Silver from Edelman presented “Activating a Global Workforce of Bloggers” at the recent Big Media & Enterprise Meetup in New York City.

View the presentation slides below:

See the presentations from previous Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetups. For Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup groups in other cities, see the full list on VIP Events and join your local group. 

Want more information about WordPress services for media or enterprise sites? Get in touch.

Evolution of the Forbes Publishing Platform with WordPress – Big Media & Enterprise Meetup New York

Vadim Supitskiy  from Forbes.com presented “Evolution of the Forbes Publishing Platform” at the recent Big Media & Enterprise Meetup in New York City.

View the presentation slides below:

See the presentations from previous Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetups. For Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup groups in other cities, see the full list on VIP Events and join your local group. 

Want more information about WordPress services for media or enterprise sites? Get in touch.

Migrating to WordPress for Publishers – Big Media & Enterprise Meetup San Francisco

Chris Scott from Voce Communications presented “Migrating to WordPress for Publishers” at the recent Big Media & Enterprise Meetup in San Francisco, California.

See the presentation slides below: 

The San Francisco Big Media & Enterprise Meetup was held on June 17, 2014. Check out the other presentations from the event.

See the presentations from previous Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetups. For Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup groups in other cities, see the full list on VIP Events and join your local group. 

Want more information about WordPress services for media or enterprise sites? Get in touch.

Media Engagement with PushUp – Big Media & Enterprise Meetup San Francisco

Jake Goldman and Vasken Hauri  from 10up presented “Increasing Big Media Engagement with PushUp” about using push notifications with WordPress at the recent Big Media & Enterprise Meetup in San Francisco, California.

View the presentation slides below:

The San Francisco Big Media & Enterprise Meetup was held on June 17, 2014. Check out the other presentations from the event.

See the presentations from previous Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetups. For Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup groups in other cities, see the full list on VIP Events and join your local group. 

Want more information about WordPress services for media or enterprise sites? Get in touch.

Lessons Learned on WordPress launches – Big Media & Enterprise Meetup San Francisco

Gabriel Koen from PMC (Variety.com, Deadline Hollywood) presented “Launches: Lessons Learned” at the recent Big Media & Enterprise Meetup in San Francisco, California.

View the presentation slides below:

The San Francisco Big Media & Enterprise Meetup was held on June 17, 2014. Check out the other presentations from the event.

See the presentations from previous Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetups. For Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup groups in other cities, see the full list on VIP Events and join your local group. 

Want more information about WordPress services for media or enterprise sites? Get in touch.