Introducing the WordPress Security White Paper

We’re very proud to share the WordPress Security White Paper with the WordPress community!

The white paper is an analysis and explanation of the WordPress core software development and its related security processes, as well as an examination of the inherent security built directly into the software. Decision makers evaluating WordPress as a content management system or web application framework should use the white paper in their analysis and decision-making, and for developers to refer to it to familiarize themselves with the security components and best practices of the software.

The WordPress Security White Paper is available directly on the WordPress.org site. In addition, the HTML and PDF versions are available at Automattic’s Documattic Updated! Now on the WordPress GitHub repository for any updates and/or additions.

We’d really love to encourage and help share translations of the white paper to the global WordPress community. If you have a translation to contribute, please add it to the WordPress GitHub repo so others can benefit, too. Pull requests welcome!

The text in the white paper (not including the WordPress logo or trademark) is licensed under CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication. You can copy, modify, distribute and perform the work, even for commercial purposes, all without asking permission.

Thank you to all who contributed to the initial release and compilation of this document: Barry Abrahamson, Michael Adams, Jon Cave, Helen Hou-Sandí, Dion Hulse, Mo Jangda, and Paul Maiorana.

Below is the table of contents for the white paper, which you can find here.

Overview
Executive Summary
An Overview of WordPress
The WordPress Core Leadership Team
The WordPress Release Cycle
Version Numbering and Security Releases
Version Backwards Compatibility
WordPress and Security
The WordPress Security Team
WordPress Security Risks, Process, and History
Automatic Background Updates for Security Releases
2013 OWASP Top 10
A1 – Injection
A2 – Broken Authentication and Session Management
A3 – Cross Site Scripting (XSS)
A4 – Insecure Direct Object Reference
A5 – Security Misconfiguration
A6 – Sensitive Data Exposure
A7 – Missing Function Level Access Control
A8 – Cross Site Request Forgery (CSRF)
A9 – Using Components with Known Vulnerabilities
A10 – Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards
Further Security Risks and Concerns
XXE (XML eXternal Entity) processing attacks
SSRF (Server Side Request Forgery) Attacks
WordPress Plugin and Theme Security
The Default Theme
The Theme Review Team
The Role of the Hosting Provider in WordPress Security
A Note about WordPress.com and WordPress security
Appendix
Core WordPress APIs
White paper content License
Additional Reading

A special note: As you can see in the table of contents, the white paper is specific to the open source core WordPress software. The core WordPress software is the foundation of WordPress.com and there are additional Security FAQ related to WordPress.com VIP here.

2 thoughts on “Introducing the WordPress Security White Paper

    1. I don’t think so. The paper is thorough by design and some topics can’t be covered briefly. But it’s public domain, so if you have a one-page version to suggest, please do so and submit it to the GitHub repo!

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