Coding Best Practices: Preventing XSS in JavaScript

Nick Daugherty, from the VIP Platform team, shares some best practices for VIP developers and anyone wanting to write secure WordPress code. For more, see our VIP Documentation

The primary vulnerability we need to be careful of in Javascript is Cross Site Scripting (XSS). We’re probably all familiar with the escaping functions we use with PHP in WordPress to avoid that — esc_html(), esc_attr(), esc_url(), etc. Given that, it only seems natural that we would also need to escape HTML in Javascript.

As it turns out out, however, that’s the wrong way to approach Javascript security. To avoid XSS, we want to avoid inserting HTML directly into the document and instead, programmatically create DOM nodes and append them to the DOM. This means avoiding .html(), .innerHTML, and other related functions, and instead using .append(), .prepend(), .before(), .after(), and so on.

Here is an example:

jQuery.ajax({
    url: 'http://any-site.com/endpoint.json'
}).done( function( data ) {
    var link = '<a href="' + data.url + '">' + data.title + '</a>';

    jQuery( '#my-div' ).html( link );
});

This approach is dangerous, because we’re trusting that the response from any-site.com includes only safe data – something we can not guarantee, even if the site is our own. Who is to say that data.title doesn’t contain alert( "haxxored");;?

Instead, the correct approach is to create a new DOM node programmatically, then attach it to the DOM:

jQuery.ajax({
    url: 'http://any-site.com/endpoint.json'
}).done( function( data ) {
    var a = jQuery( '<a />' );
    a.attr( 'href', data.url );
    a.text( data.title );

    jQuery( '#my-div' ).append( a );
});

Note: It’s technically faster to insert HTML, because the browser is optimized to parse HTML. The best solution is to minimize insertions of DOM nodes by building larger objects in memory then insert it into the DOM all at once, when possible.

By passing the data through either jQuery or the browser’s DOM API’s, we ensure the values are properly sanitized and remove the need to inject insecure HTML snippets into the page.

To ensure the security of your application, use the DOM APIs provided by the browser (or jQuery) for all DOM manipulation.

Escaping Dynamic JavaScript Values

When it comes to sending dynamic data from PHP to JavaScript, care must be taken to ensure values are properly escaped. The core function esc_js() helps escape JavaScript for us in DOM attributes, while all other values should be encoded with json_encode().

From the WP Codex on esc_js():

It is intended to be used for inline JS (in a tag attribute, for example onclick=”…”).

If you’re not working with inline JS in HTML event handler attributes, a more suitable function to use is json_encode, which is built-in to PHP.

This approach is incorrect:

var title = '<?php echo esc_js( $title ); ?>';
var content = '<?php echo esc_js( $content ); ?>';
var comment_count = '<?php echo esc_js( $comment_count ); ?>';

Instead, it’s better to use json_encode() (note that json_encode() adds the quotes automatically):

var title = <?php echo wp_json_encode( $title ); ?>;
var content = <?php echo wp_json_encode( $content ); ?>;
var comment_count = <?php echo wp_json_encode( $comment_count ); ?>;

Stripping Tags

It may be tempting to use .html() followed by .text() to strip tags – but this approach is still vulnerable to attack:

// Incorrect
var text = jQuery('<div />').html( some_html_string ).text();
jQuery( '.some-div' ).html( text );

Setting the HTML of an element will always trigger things like src attributes to be executed, which can lead to attacks like this:

// XSS attack waiting to happen
var some_html_string = '<img src="a" onerror="alert('haxxored');" />';

As soon as that string is set as a DOM element’s HTML (even if it’s not currently attached to the DOM!), src will be loaded, will error out, and the code in the onerror handler will be executed…all before .text() is ever called.

The need to strip tags is indicative of bad practices – remember, always use the appropriate API for DOM manipulation.

// Correct
jQuery( '.some-div' ).text( some_html_string );

Other Common XSS Vectors

  • Using eval(). Never do this.
  • Un-whitelisted / un-sanitized data from urls, url fragments, query strings, cookies
  • Including un-trusted / un-reviewed 3rd party JS libraries
  • Using out-dated / un-patched 3rd party JS libraries

Helpful Resources

Ready to get started?

Tell us about your needs

Let us lead the way. We’ll help you select a top tier development partner. We’ll train your developers, operations, infrastructure, and editorial teams. We’ll coarchitect your deployment processes. We will provide live support for peak events. We’ll help your people avoid dark alleys and blind corners, and reduce wasted cycles.

%d bloggers like this: