2016 VIP Workshop – Session Update

We are closing in on the registration for this year’s VIP Workshop. Have you registered yet? If not, please find our helpful button below…

 

If you’re new to the VIP Workshop, our team hosts the premier event focused on the needs of enterprise WordPress users. We provide content for both engineers as well as business and product leads with the goal of providing the most well-rounded, relevant program possible.

For the Developer track…

  • a double-session covering WP-API, including using it on WordPress.com;
  • a content syndication roundtable that will feature clients’ and partners’ perspectives;
  • a review of automated testing strategies tailored to working with our platform;
  • a session dedicated to managing large networks of sites and the challenges that this presents; and
  • a review of some of the significant outages we’ve dealt with, the lessons learned, and how these can be prevented.

For the Business track…

  • Exponential Results with Small Teams – Time is our most precious resource. We should constantly spend resources to recapture it so we can put it back to work elsewhere.
  • The Product Game – Teamwork, decision-making, and change management.
  • Making the Most of Your Data – Using anonymous user data to keep people on your site today and in the future.
  • The Convergence of Content, Design, and Technology – The evolution from a channel-based approach to one that aligns and connects multiple capabilities to achieve its core objectives and enable innovation.
  • Net Neutrality – A leading voice on this subject will take us through some history as well as a look ahead.
  • Emerging Market Internet – Emerging market internet is the last blue ocean of users, but how do you optimize for their slow speeds and small screens?

We are incredibly excited for what we know will be the best VIP Workshop yet. If you haven’t registered yet, do it now before it’s too late!

 

Announcing the 2016 VIP Workshop

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May 9-12, 2016 @ The Carneros Inn

We are excited to announce the next installment of the WordPress.com VIP Workshop! As the leading provider of enterprise WordPress solutions, WordPress.com VIP provides the premier event focused on the needs of enterprise WordPress users. In our 5th year of the VIP Workshop we’re adding sessions for product owners in addition to our developer sessions. Also new to this year – a Best of WordPress.com VIP showcase where we recognize the best of your work over the past year (stay tuned for when we open the request for entries).

 

The VIP Workshop provides a unique opportunity to learn from the WordPress.com VIP team in person, as well as exchange ideas and experiences with other WordPress.com VIP clients and partners through networking lunches and dinners, in-depth curriculum and exercises, and focused, collaborative conversations.

A quick peek at the itinerary – details & agenda will be continually updated on the WordPress.com VIP Workshop page.

  • Monday, May 9th — Arrival Day. Check-in, special guest keynote and welcome dinner.
  • Tuesday, May 10th — In depth business and engineering sessions.
  • Wednesday, May 11th — In-depth product sessions and hands-on development workshops. We’ll wrap the day up with the Best of WordPress.com VIP showcase!
  • Thursday, May 12th — Departure Day.

Space is limited for this event, so register now and take advantage of early bird pricing! Early bird pricing is $3,500 each until March 15. After which, the full participant price will raise to $4,000.

Images by CM Howard from the 2015 Automattic WordPress developer summit at the Carneros Inn in Napa, CA

Images by CM Howard from the 2015 Automattic WordPress developer summit at the Carneros Inn in Napa, CA

Toronto BigWP and Developer Training Coming Soon!

The WordPress.com VIP team will be hosting both a BigWP event and a training course in the Toronto area this month, and we would love to see you there!

BigWP is a meetup event crafted specifically for professionals deploying, managing, or working with WordPress installations in enterprise environments. If you work with a large, high-traffic WordPress installation, you’ll find short and informative talks from other people who are doing innovative things with the same.

Our Developer Fundamentals II training course is designed to assist WordPress developers with learning best practices in code security and performance to help safeguard critical, high-scale WordPress environments, but you’ll learn things that apply to WordPress installations of all shapes and sizes.

BigWP

BigWP is a networking and education event focused on supporting developers, product managers, and editorial teams who run large, high-traffic WordPress sites. We’ll have a handful of short (5-10 minutes) flash talks on the following topics:

  • Google’s AMP on WordPress
  • Scaling WordPress for High-Traffic Sites
  • Developing Gamification for WordPress
  • Powering a TV Channel with WordPress

When: Tuesday, March 15th at 7 p.m.
Where: Shaw Media, 121 Bloor St. East
Event and speaker information is here.

Training: Developer Fundamentals II

WordPress Fundamentals II is a day-long, intensive course meant to improve WordPress developers’ understanding of advanced concepts. The workshop focuses on code security and performance, and will be taught by Stéphane Boisvert and Mo Jangda.

We recommend the training session for all developers working with enterprise-level WordPress deployments as the concepts discussed will apply universally.

When: Tuesday, March 15th at 9 a.m.
Where: The Foundery, 376 Bathurst St.
Cost: $950 CAD per attendee
For more details or to purchase a ticket, please visit the Eventbrite page. The class is limited to 20 participants – please sign up ASAP!

If you have any questions about either event, please get in touch!

Join the VIP team at an Upcoming Event!

We hope you’re staying out of the snowdrifts and keeping warm wherever you are, and we wanted to make sure you knew of some upcoming events the WordPress.com VIP is organizing or participating in, in the near future. We hope to see you and have a chat at any of these events!

We’re meeting & greeting in Seattle! If you’re in or around the Seattle later this month, several members of the WordPress.com VIP team are hosting an informal meet and greet on February 24th! Please get in touch if you’ll be in the area so we can send you an invite.

The Big Media & Enterprise (BM&E) WordPress Meetups are a great way to meet other developers, product managers, and editorial teams who use large, high-traffic WordPress sites. The evening is usually centered around 3-4 flash talks followed by discussion and networking. Past BM&E events have been held in NYC, Boston, San Francisco, Toronto, and London.

Boston’s BM&E is March 10th, after two reschedules due to snow. We’re hoping the date sticks (and not the snow)! You can join the Boston group on Meetup.com & RSVP here.

March Big Media & Enterprise Meetup

Tuesday, Mar 10, 2015, 6:45 PM

Workbar Cambridge
45 Prospect Street Cambridge, MA

45 Members Attending

** Update Part 3: We’ve rescheduled this meetup to March 10 because of snow and transit difficulties. Thank you for your patience! **The Big Media & Enterprise meetup is open to developers, product managers, and editorial teams who run large, high-traffic WordPress sites. If you plan on attending, please be sure to RSVP.Doors open at 6:45 p.m.,…

Check out this Meetup →

London’s BM&E is also March 10th. We’re headed back to London for another event! You can join the London group on Meetup.com & RSVP here.

March 2015 Meetup

Tuesday, Mar 10, 2015, 6:30 PM

Westminster HUB
80 Haymarket #1st floor SW1Y 4TE London, GB

15 Members Attending

The Big Media & Enterprise meetup is open to developers, product managers, and editorial teams who use large, high-traffic WordPress sites. If you plan on attending, please be sure to RSVP as space is limited.Doors open at 6:30 p.m., presentations will begin at 7 p.m. We will have 4 “flash talk” presentations, each lasting 10 minutes, followed by…

Check out this Meetup →

We’ll also be coming back to San Francisco on April 8th for a Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup. You can join the San Francisco group on Meetup.com & RSVP here.

April 2015 Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup

Wednesday, Apr 8, 2015, 6:45 PM

Automattic Lounge
132 Hawthorne St San Francisco, CA

1 Members Attending

The Big Media & Enterprise meetup is open to developers, product managers, and editorial teams who run large, high-traffic WordPress sites. If you plan on attending, please be sure to RSVP as space is limited.Doors open at 6:45 p.m., presentations will begin at 7 p.m. We will have 4 “flash talk” presentations, each lasting 10 minutes, followed by …

Check out this Meetup →

Also in April, a few WordPress.com VIP team members will be at the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) Show in Las Vegas, from April 13-16th. Will you be there? Get in touch.

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And our flagship event, the WordPress.com VIP Intensive Developer Workshop, is happening in May 4-7th and still has space available. More information on the event, and you can pre-register here.

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Several of the WordPress.com VIP team will also be at WordCamp London from March 20-22nd. If you’re attending, please say hi!

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To keep up-to-date with our events, follow @WordPressVIP on Twitter and check our VIP Events page.

Pre-Registration for the WordPress.com VIP Workshop 2015 is now open!

The next edition of the WordPress.com VIP Workshop will be May 4-7, 2015! We announced the event to clients weeks ago, and pre-registration for the event is now open! 

Do you run a large-scale WordPress site with millions of pageviews per month? Are you interested in optimizing and scaling up your enterprise site, and utilizing the latest WordPress features for your content? Do you want to share best practices, code shortcuts, and lessons learned with other VIPs?

The next WordPress.com Intensive VIP Developer Workshop will take place in May 2015, and this three-day event will include a packed curriculum for VIP developers with expert instructors from Automattic, the makers of WordPress.com.

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The Intensive VIP Developer Workshop provides a unique opportunity to learn from the WordPress.com VIP team in person, as well as exchange ideas and experiences with other WordPress.com VIP clients and partners through networking lunches and dinners, in-depth WordPress curriculum and exercises, and focused, collaborative conversations.

You’ll hear from other big brands and enterprises through flash talk sessions where WordPress.com VIPs will share their own experiences with building VIP-scale websites using WordPress, their workflows, shortcuts, lessons learned, and best practices, too.

We continue to receive great feedback on the VIP Workshop from attendees, and last year’s feedback was excellent:

  • 100% of participants surveyed said they would recommend the conference to their colleagues and
  • 92.68% said they would come again!

A quick peek at the itinerary – details & agenda will be continually updated on the WordPress.com VIP Workshop page, and we’ll be returning to The Carneros Inn in Napa, California.

  • May 4th: Arrival in the afternoon. Welcome, networking reception & dinner.
  • May 5-6th: Full days of training with VIP instructors, followed by networking dinners.
  • May 7th: Wrap-up, farewell breakfast, and morning departures.

Register now and take advantage of early bird pricing! Early bird pricing is set at $3,250 each until January 31st. After which, the full participant price will raise to $3,600.

If you’re interested in attending in 2015, just fill out the pre-registration form here or send in a ticket to VIP Support. We’ll work with you on organizing payment and confirming your registration for the event.

VIP Training Days in San Francisco & New York in November

In November we’ll be hosting VIP Training Days, our intensive, one-day, in-person training courses led by a team of WordPress.com VIP instructors, in both San Francisco and New York City.

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In each location, we’ll be offering our existing Developer Fundamentals I and Superuser courses, and our newest developer course, Site Security & Debugging. VIP Training Days courses are limited to no more than 20 people with each team of VIP instructors which ensures lots of hands-on learning and interaction.

  • Developer Fundamentals I — for beginner PHP developers & advanced PHP developers new to WordPress. A great review of WordPress fundamentals and best practices and the codebase, with a focus on themes and plugins.
  • Superuser — for site administrators, editors, and trainers for large or multi-author sites. A deep dive into the entire publishing process as well as managing users, comments, social integrations, mobile, and more.
  • Developer Fundamentals: Site Security & Debugging — for experienced WordPress developers. Attendees will learn how to think like an attacker and exploit the vulnerabilities before fixing them with security best practices and various debugging techniques.

These courses are suitable for both self-hosted and WordPress.com VIP sites/superusers/developers – the large majority of the material will focus on core WordPress functionality/features. You can read on below for more information about the other courses, or go directly to the event registration pages where each course is also explained in detail.

For current VIP clients & partners, there is a client discount available if you register before October 10th – please get in touch for the discount code. If you’re planning on sending two or more participants to VIP Training Days, please get in touch as well as we’d like to offer you a special group discount.

Register for VIP Training Days in November!

Current VIP clients & partners can contact us to be invoiced directly if preferred.

A special thanks to WordPress.com VIP Service Partner Voce Platforms (@VocePlatforms) for offering their offices for the New York training.

Be a part of the Big Media & Enterprise WordPress community in San Francisco and New York!

Be sure to join the Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup in San Francisco or the Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup in New York City! Meetups happen regularly. The next meetup in San Francisco is November 4th, and the next one in New York City is December 9th!

More information about the VIP Training Days courses:

VIP Training Days: Developer Fundamentals I Training

Description

WordPress Fundamentals I is a day-long, intensive course meant to introduce PHP developers to programming for WordPress. Attendees should be familiar with WordPress as a tool, and have a working understanding of its general terminology. Proficiency with PHP is also a must, but no knowledge of the WordPress code itself is expected. This is a great course for developers looking to build sites which will scale to VIP levels, and write secure and scalable code.

Prerequisites

  • Proficiency with basic PHP development.
  • Awareness of WordPress as a platform, including common terminology such as a post, a page, widgets, and sidebars.
  • A local development environment running WordPress Trunk. We will provide a virtual machine ahead of time for participants who don’t have their own development environments, but they will be responsible for setting it up ahead of time.

Course Materials & Requirements

Each student will provide their own computer (laptop) for the course, with working wifi functionality. A lunch break and light lunch will be provided by WordPress.com VIP. Students should have a local working copy of WordPress trunk installed and tested prior to the training. To download trunk: http://wordpress.org/download/svn/

Curriculum Overview

  • Intro to WordPress core, SVN, and Trac, history and culture
  • Developer environment and debugging tools
  • WordPress Development Best Practices
  • Introduction to Plugins
  • Actions and filters
  • Introduction to Themes
  • The Loop & WP_Query
  • More on themes
  • …and more!

VIP Training Days: Developer Fundamentals Training: Site Security & Debugging

WordPress Fundamentals: Site Security & Debugging is a day-long, intensive course meant to improve WordPress developers’ understanding of advanced concepts. Attendees should be familiar with developing WordPress plugins and themes or should have attended our Developer Fundamentals I course.

We’ll cover the basics of writing secure code. Instead of just listing vulnerabilities, attendees will learn how to think like an attacker and exploit the vulnerabilities before fixing them. In the course of learning more about security, we will introduce various debugging techniques to help attendees find problems in the code faster.

Prerequisites

  • Proficiency with PHP development.

  • Awareness of WordPress as a platform, including common terminology such as a post, a page, widgets, and sidebars.

  • Proficiency with basic WordPress plugin and theme development – actions, filters, loading assets, main core APIs.

  • The latest version of VirtualBox: https://www.virtualbox.org/

Curriculum Overview

  • Security: common types of vulnerabilities

  • Security: exploiting and fixing open redirects

  • Security: exploiting and fixing XSS problems in HTML, JS, and CSS

  • Security: exploiting and fixing CSRF vulnerabilities

  • Security: exploiting and fixing SQL injection problems

  • Security: exploiting and fixing remote file inclusion attacks

  • Security: exploiting and fixing clickjacking attacks

VIP Training Days: Superuser Training

Description

In this course, you’ll learn how to manage and use the WordPress interface from a site owner’s point of view; as someone who will be managing multiple users, their permissions, and ultimately sharing knowledge with them about how to use WordPress to publish a great site with an active community and/or audience. We like to think of this course as our teachers teaching your teachers – those who will serve as the WordPress expert in an organization.

We’ll also do a deep dive into the publishing process so our superusers can teach their editors, authors, and contributors how to best use the WordPress interface. From creating and publishing posts to managing tags and categories, from mastering multimedia and images in articles, and bulk management of posts and pages, we’ll cover the entire publishing process from draft to done.

Prerequisites

Users should have a working (beyond basic) knowledge of the WordPress administration panel / backend. They should be managers, administrators, or editors of an existing or future WordPress site with multiple users.

Course Materials & Requirements

Each student will provide their own laptop computer (no tablets) for the course, with working wifi functionality. A lunch break and light lunch will be provided by WordPress.com VIP to all students. For the purposes of the course, students will be given access to a WordPress.com site. Users will be requested to create a WordPress.com username if they don’t have one, and this username will be submitted to the course instructor. To create a WordPress.com username: http://en.wordpress.com/signup/

Curriculum Overview

  • User Management: roles, permissions, and invitations
  • User Profiles: settings, preferences, and Gravatars
  • Comments: moderation, spam, and notifications
  • Creating & Publishing posts
  • Managing tags and categories
  • Mastering Media: images, galleries, and slideshows
  • Bulk management of Posts and Pages
  • …and more!

Register for VIP Training Days in November!

Current VIP clients & partners can contact us to be invoiced directly if preferred.

Have any questions? Get in touch.

WordPress.com VIP at ONA and WordCamp Europe

This weekend members of the WordPress.com VIP and extended Automattic family will be present at two events: the Online News Association (ONA) 2014 Conference in Chicago, and WordCamp Europe in Sofia, Bulgaria!

At the Online News Association conference, members of the WordPress.com VIP team will be there along with a few of our colleagues from Automattic. We’ll be sponsoring a refreshment booth featuring coffee from Chicago’s Bow Truss Coffee Roasters, a sister company of our Featured Partner agency, Doejo. Be sure to stop by! Find out more about ONA.

logo11At WordCamp Europe, members of the WordPress.com VIP team will be there, as well as colleagues from Automattic. We’ll be at the WordPress.com VIP & Automattic sponsor booth as well as I am going to be presenting “7 Habits of Highly Effective Enterprise WordPress Sites” on Sunday. Several other Automatticians will be presenting that weekend as well —see the whole WordCamp Europe schedule.

If you’ll be at either event, drop us a note in the comments! We’d love to say hello. 

For WordCamp Europe, we ended up having two extra event tickets we’d like to donate back to the community. To get one, just leave a comment below and we’ll forward your information on to the WCEU organizing committee. Airfare, transportation, and all other expenses are not being provided and are at the expense of the commenter. 

One Theme, One Multisite, 30+ Unique Websites – Now With Full Transcript

Simon Dickson and Simon WheatleyCode for the People, presented “One Theme, One Multisite, 30+ Unique Websites” at the recent Big Media & Enterprise Meetup in New York City. We’ve shared this post previously, but we’re publishing it again now with full transcript below.

 

Okay, so I’m Simon Wheatley, my partner Simon Dickson is just over there and we’re from a company called Code For The People.

We’re one of the VIP partners and I want to talk to you today about a client who came to us, similar I guess to the Oomph guys,the Interactive One guys, just been talking about one thing, but dealing with many websites initially 30.

This is for a magazine publisher in the UK, so they wanted to move 30 of their titles initially on to this platform but they wanted one standardized theme, one standardized set of functionalities that they could use.

So our solution for them is based in a couple things that I’m going to talk about tonight one is the WordPress theme customizer and one is the way we’re handling layouts using widgets and widget areas so these solutions are things you can apply in other organization. You can have your WordPress themed cake made by my partner’s wife and you can eat it at the same time.

So you get in this way, using this customization but based on the standardized theme, you get to reduce maintenance and at the same time keep the editorial teams happy.

So I’m going to talk through three of the areas where we allow editorial control so obviously there’s colours, I’m going to talk about typography and I’m going to talk about layout.

So the first element, colour, we started off with the idea that we would have the user pick half a dozen colours and we would then do colour calculations based around on let’s find some complimentary colours let’s find some lights and dark equivalents and then we’ll be able to work out how of those six colours, we can deal with the header and the footer and the body post but that actually gradually became unwieldy.

So you get in this way, using this customization but based on the standardized theme, you get to reduce maintenance and at the same time keep the editorial teams happy.

We found ourselves adding more and more colour options to avoid a clash of dark colours appearing on dark colours or red appearing on green, that kind of thing and the solution that we arrived at eventually was that we split it into two colour palettes, so there are two colour palettes which we call palette A and palette B and then we split the page into three areas. We’ve got the header area which can have one palette assigned the body of the page which can have another palette separately applied to it and then obviously the footer which can have a completely different palette.

So there are three palettes there, with about 12 different areas and we’re just using the standard WordPress theme customizer to allow you to pick the colour for that we’re still doing a little bit of colour calculation, lightening and darkening and so on but essentially it’s the two palettes applied to different areas of the page. We don’t take the standard approach that some themes take of just injecting a whole bunch of CSS into the head. Instead, we’re using LESS with CSS Preprocessor.

Probably now looking at the fact that core have adopted SASS, we could be using SASS but at the end of the day it’s all CSS Preprocessing. It all really does the same thing, it’s taking variables from the customizer and injecting them into CSS and using that to build the final styles for the website.

It’s simpler and cleaner than shoving a load of overrides in your head. So that’s colours, let’s talk about typography. Obviously there’s a number of font services out there and we’re going to want to give 30 editorial teams a good choice of fonts for their websites.

So we’re using the Google Fonts API, there’s a wide wide variety of fonts there and we’ve built a custom control for the customizer so can pick say the open sans fonts and because we’re dealing with the API. We know that there are these variants and weights associated with that and then we can be applying a text transform so that you’ve got fully uppercased for the navigation, but you’re just capitalizing for the headers or whatever.

That’s the one customizer control, which has got three sub-controls within it we looked around and found a couple of those on the internet in the .org repository but they all seemed to be making a bit of a meal of it and we ended up making something that turned out simpler but works quite nicely.

It’s simpler and cleaner than shoving a load of overrides in your head.

What you’ll see we haven’t got there is a font size for each individual element. We’re not setting a font size for the heading and then font-size for the subheading. Instead, we’re setting a base font size and then we’re using multipliers up from that. So maybe 16 pixels or something and then the heading is 1.5x that and the meta is 1x that or whatever.

So let’s talk about layout. We started out with layout with some very grandiose ideas that you might recognize from other themes and options that you’ve got out there. We were going to allow the user to draw areas on the screen and we we’re going to then use those as widget areas and drop stuff into those and then we we’re going to magically work out how we calculated the break points so that you could you know have tablet portrait, tablet landscape.

Eventually we took a step back from that and realized we could accomplish pretty much the same thing but in a much much simpler way.

Eventually we took a step back from that and realized we could accomplish pretty much the same thing but in a much much simpler way. So if we look at the primary content area on the left there, we’ve got a grid of widget areas so we’ve got a widget area at the top spanning then we’ve got the two-column side by side and then we repeat the same again. But of course with the widget area in WordPress you don’t need to put widgets in it.

So if you wanted to have just a single column of news in the primary content area then you just put widgets in the double span that comes second in there. Or, if you want a two-column layout, then you can just use the top two. Every so often in the year, when you’ve got a promotional item, you can be putting that in your double span above those to columns, so it gives it a lot of flexibility.

Because it’s a known quantity, it means that we can scale down to the various breakpoints and we know exactly what we’re doing and we’ve got a really nice responsive website and that comes out really really well when you start actually putting content in it this website, the fields, they started building that yesterday at 11 o’clock in the morning and by 3 o’clock in the afternoon, they had a site, fully migrated, fully customized with all the old content in it from the old custom content management system and up and running, so it comes up through the breakpoints.

Nice shotgun advert there for the shooting season coming up.

And then the desktop, full desktop width…so let’s, just taking a look at this page, we’ve got one widget that’s controlling a lot of this stuff. So if you look at the news sequence of posts and the food and drink sequence of posts, they’re using the same widget, and that’s something that we call the post query widget which is essentially a wp query builder for those you who know what I mean by that.

It’s putting together a series of parameters by which you’re going to reach into the database, grab the post that you want and get to display them on the page so you can choose the post type that you want to display in the particular widget that you’re editing at the moment. You can filter it down by the taxonomies and then you can go to actually start displaying that.

We do that by breaking the sequence of posts up into sections, so section one here has just got one post in it, it’s a list with a large image. Section two, you’ve got two posts, smaller images, and we’ll show the author and we’ll show the date there. Then section three is just a text bulleted list without any additional detail in there.

What that comes up as is something like that so it gives you really quite a flexible display of how you’re going to pull the posts in and then how you’re going to actually show them on the screen and you could have all large images or all bullet points, pretty much anything you want

We don’t limit the number of sections there so another thing I wanted to mention was category archives so again, we’ve got a customizer control in there so select your category and then choose similar again to the way that we’re dealing with the query widget so similar, we look at the style that you want that in, maybe this category you’ve got some really nice images, maybe the review images you’ve got are great and you want to highlight that

So you’ve got the ability to customize the display on the category there, so I’ve whistle stopped through this we talked a little bit about colours, so we’re using the colour API a little bit of calculation, we’re using LESS in CSS Preprocessing there talked about typography, so we’ve used the Google Fonts API to allow you to choose a font we know from the Google Fonts API, what the variants are, so we can pick that and we can give you a transform, we’ve got the base font size we talked about layout, we talked about the post query widget and about the custom layouts for categories so has anybody got any questions?

Q: Are you guys supporting live previewing in addition to the standard customizer stuff?

A: Yeah, absolutely, so all of this stuff, I mean if you’re not familiar with the customizer, one of the great things about it is nothing is live until you click the save and publish so all of this customization is happening just for you personally so even with the LESS Preprocessing, that’s being piped off into a separate stylesheet which is only being served to the editor that’s actually doing the customization at the moment

Q: ( […] )

A: Yeah, we’re working with posts, obviously the built in post type which they’re using for articles, we’ve got a custom post type for events and for reviews as well so the post query widget that I showed you, you can say I want to see just reviews here or just events here and it will allow you to display those

Q: ([…])

A: Some of the titles that we’re dealing with are relatively low staffed So I don’t think that kind of title would be necessarily looking at clicks we have got an evolution of the post query widget which looks at Google Analytics and uses the Google Analytics API to evaluate what’s popular in a particular category so you can use that as the sort mechanism, but that’s not something that’s live on the site at the moment

Q: ([…])

A: Yeah, so the widget areas that are there for the, where are we, let’s skip back through yeah the widget areas that are here are exactly the same widget areas, they’re just, they cascade through with the different break points and we move them around so this is the full desktop width but if you can quickly scan you can see that the same widget areas are just linearizing basically as you move down through the sizes so it’s exactly the same stuff ([…]) absolutely yeah responsive break points any more for any more

Q: ([…])

A: At the moment, pre-3.9 the disadvantage is anything you do to a widget is live on the site immediately, post 3.9 widgets move into the customizer so we’re able then to choose the widget layout and mess around in the same way exactly the same was as I said for the rest of the customizer, you can change your colours, change your fonts it’s not live until you click save and publish so 3.9 is going to herald a grand new dawn in terms of that being able to get right before it’s live

Q: ([…])

A: The brief for the widgets was that it wasn’t so much of a manual curation process, so if we needed to manually curate this particular post into position in this particular area of the homepage

I guess you could get around that by hacking with tags, but it wasn’t a core part of the brief that we were able to do that, so using something like zoninator where you can precisely choose which post to go and in which order they appear in wasn’t a requirement we could develop a different widget that did something like that I think we would probably still stick with widgets we’re also looking at doing some work to customize

so you can take the homepage layout and then for a particular purpose maybe for a sponsorship section have all of the sidebars completely custom for that but hidden from normal view so It’s only when you’re editing that page that you go in and those side bars are only live when you’re editing that page, that set of sidebars so you don’t end up with this situation wherein the WordPress admin area, the widget section you’re looking at all the sidebars and there’s like 300 sidebars which one am I adding the widgets in and which one am I not we’re able to actually filter which sidebars are being shown for a particular purpose

Q: ([…])

A: Yeah exactly that principle yeah.

Q: ([…])

A: Yeah, so like I say, some of these are fairly low staffed publications so the key for them is probably that they’ll set something up and then they won’t touch it for a little while we’re using a plugin which is available on the .org repository called the customizer settings revisions which allows you to save what you’ve created so you might go like “okay, this is the Christmas layout” with all the pretty snowflakes and the lovely snowy red design and then you can pop back to that when Christmas comes around again or when Easter comes around or whatever you want to do thematically so we’re using that plugin for that purpose

Q: ([…])

A: So the ads are outside of the widget areas, they’re placed at various points in the page that we know how to deal with for again, for the responsive break points are we concerned about the responsive kind of nature of it and so on, yeah so we have, we haven’t got the ability to do the thing that really you only do to show your boss that the site’s responsive which is you know, move the site edges in and out and change the width of the page, the adverts won’t change at that point because they only change on page load, it will look at the width and then ascertain what ads you need and then load them at that point does that answer the question?

Cool. Thank you.

 

See the presentations from previous Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetups. For Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup groups in other cities, see the full list on VIP Events and join your local group. 

Want more information about WordPress services for media or enterprise sites? Get in touch.

Harvard Business Review and WordPress – Now With Full Transcript

Kevin Newman from Harvard Business Publishing, presented “Adapting WordPress’ role within a larger content strategy” at the recent Big Media & Enterprise Meetup in Boston. We’ve shared his presentation previously, and we’re publishing it again now with full transcript below. 

View the presentation slides here:

 

I can tell a story about where, what blogging means to HBR and what role WordPress plays. A little bit of history first. HBR is a storied print publication. It’s been around for 90+ years, one of the cornerstone publications in management science and practice.

It’s a great product and I love it but right around 2007, 2006, there was a desire to push the boundaries a little bit and get out of the ivory tower, see where our new audiences could be.

This is slightly before my time, I came on board around 2008, so as I started to experiment with different content forms, namely blogging. I ended up going with Moveable Type. Moveable Type, at the time, had a feature that easily allowed for multiple authors, static publishing of an asset which was attractive.

WordPress and Moveable Type way back when, were kind of neck and neck and it was really a coin toss whether or not we were going to go either way. We ended up going with Moveable Type and that’s where myself and a couple of other people were hired to help grow the business a little bit, to help it along.

Moveable Type was not literally, but just about on somebody’s desktop computer under their desk being posted in kind of a hacky way and they wanted to make it a more sustainable business.

We’re also seeing that readers are coming to the site and some readers are getting just as much value out of a blog post or what’s now a blog post, as they are in the print article.

The point of the digital business at the time was to develop the markets in advertising and subscription and e-commerce. At the time, they were seeing some success in e-commerce.

So at the time, Harvard Business Publishing was a catalogue site, but they felt like, the board felt and a number of people felt like we can serve readers as well. So we’re looking to create that new audience, meet that new audience without sacrificing the quality and carry it forward, or so the intention was.

We went to Moveable Type, everything was going great but then we started to hit up against a couple of constraints. Long story short, editorial really wanted to go with WordPress and it ended up working out really well in the technical sense as well.

The editors love it, the ad sales folks love it, it does a great job making sure that the tags that the editors are putting in make it all the way out there.

So we ended up transitioning to WordPress last year off of Moveable Type, working with Automattic VIP to get all of this, all of our, what would it be, 4-5 years of blogging, all the meta data, all the operatives, all the work that went into getting onto WordPress.

It went very very well all the expectations, actually exceeded all the expectations. The good news is that everybody absolutely loves it, absolutely loves it. The editors love it, the ad sales folks love it, it does a great job making sure that the tags that the editors are putting in make it all the way out there. There’s nothing in between.We want to make sure everything is accurate.

The other good news is that there’s a deep community there. There’s a lot of people that use it if we go to some sort of conference, either technical or editorial, odds are if we talk to someone about the process, they’re also using WordPress.

More good news is that there’s tons of developers, tons of plugins, if you don’t know how to get it done, or you’re just lazy, you can probably do a quick search and you’ll find a plugin that will get you a good way there. So it’s been a great decision across the board, now we’re heading in a new direction.

HBR.org is in the midst of a pretty big redesign. A lot of it’s visual, there’s some underlying plumbing that’s getting changed as well and we wanted to keep WordPress.

So one of the key strategic changes that I wanted to mention is that we’re moving towards, we’re coming from a model that works very well, where there’s pretty hard lines between print content and online content, stuff that is not in the magazine.

What we’re going to do is even that balance out a little bit, where an article, is really an article. Certainly there’s a difference between a print article and an online article but we’re also seeing that readers are coming to the site and some readers are getting just as much value out of a blog post or what’s now a blog post, as they are in the print article.

With this redesign, we’re going to kind of even the playing field a little bit and everything’s going to be presented to the user as helping them solve their problem.

Less of a division between what’s in the issue versus what can you find online exclusively. So it’s just going to be content: “how can we help you solve your management problems?” “How can we make you a better manager?”.

It doesn’t matter if it’s a blog, doesn’t matter, well it matters if it’s in the print magazine of course, subscription, it matters. But readers don’t see the difference that we do, we need to make sure that we’re solving their problems.

So we look across the site…Barack Obama organizing for America 2.0. That could be almost anything, it’s not necessarily related to an issue. WordPress is a big part of that.

As we move forward, we’re taking all the entire archive of HBR and the entire archive now of all the blog posts and we’re putting them all in WordPress. We’re going to have every single piece of readable content and actually multimedia as well, in WordPress and part of that is because of technical flexibility.

It’s under the theory of let’s let the best tool do their job, in other words, we feel like we’ve found a great tool and everybody’s happy.

My job, my team’s job is to make sure we’re never painted in a corner. We can do whatever we want next year if we want to change directions. WordPress is a fantastic tool for that.

The other reason we’re doing this is because editors love it. They absolutely love going to this tool, they use it all the time. I don’t have to deal with it. I don’t have to, we built so many tools for them, and you know some of them were great, some of them weren’t, we don’t have to worry about that now. It’s under the theory of let’s let the best tool do their job, in other words, we feel like we’ve found a great tool and everybody’s happy.

So next, is a quick snapshot of our architecture. This is our current architecture, so very quickly you can see HBR.org there and that site, the core of the site is an application, a Java-based application, Jvos specific application server, and it integrates below the line.

Those are deep integrations, those are behind the scenes. In our core integrations we have databases, e-commerce, search, user services and platform Web services that we share with other units in our business.

Then we have above our application server layers, advertising discussions and recommendations. Those are page-level integrations, some of them we serve, we make sure they have whatever information. They need to be relevant, but largely, it’s that one line of javascript on a page over here, way off on the left, is blogs at HBR.org currently on VIP.

We can do whatever we want next year if we want to change directions. WordPress is a fantastic tool for that.

The integration there is Javascript, so the users credentials representation gets passed back and forth, so as you’re navigating around, it’s a seamless experience.nIt’s in fact, completely different, but to the user it doesn’t matter. So that was a step towards making sure that even though there’s a blog post versus print – that the user doesn’t care, shouldn’t care.

The big change with the redesign is that it’s gonna move WordPress into our fold. What we’re going to do is because we have the entire archive posted on the WordPress instances. We’re going to integrate with it on the application level, rather than have WordPress serve up these pages.

So now within the same mix of the database is the search, the user services, all the other integration services that we use like e-commerce etc. The whole point is that the application is matching the content with the user, we’ve been able to chip away at this for years and now I feel like we’ve got it.

So WordPress is the content and all these other services are the user. Like what is the user doing? What is the user buying? What apps are they seeing? What can we do to better serve them?

And that’s the way we’re going, so that’s it in a nutshell, how’d I do? (You have 2 minutes left) I have two minutes left? I was suppose to be here with Matt Wagner, he’s sick.

He’s the one that really owns these two slides, so I probably didn’t do the amount of work justice, but it’s incredibly important, especially on the tech side.

We’ve been able accommodate the business with this kind of strategy over the last few years, making sure that we would serve the editorial side and serve the user side and so far so good. WordPress is a big part of that.

See the presentations from previous Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetups. For Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup groups in other cities, see the full list on VIP Events and join your local group. 

Want more information about WordPress services for media or enterprise sites? Get in touch.

WordPress Superuser Training Materials now Open Source on GitHub

Adding to the previous resources and presentations we’ve released to Documattic, our GitHub repository, we’re happy to release what we think will be a valuable resource for the WordPress community at-large: the WordPress.com VIP Superuser Training course!

The Superuser Training course is aimed at site administrators, site owners, editors, and trainers for large or multi-author sites:

In this course, the participant will learn how to manage and use the WordPress interface from a site owner’s point of view; as someone who will be managing multiple users, their permissions, and ultimately sharing knowledge with them about how to use WordPress to publish a great site with an active community and/or audience. We like to think of this course as teaching your teachers – those who will serve as the WordPress experts in an organization.

The course also does a deep dive into the publishing process so superusers can teach their editors, authors, and contributors how to best use the WordPress interface. From creating and publishing posts to managing tags and categories, from mastering multimedia and images in articles, and bulk management of posts and pages, it’ll cover the entire publishing process from draft to done.

Previously, the Superuser Training course was only presented to VIP clients and partners who took the in-person course taught by VIP instructors during our VIP Training Days, which we’ve done in San Francisco, New York, Toronto, and London, and will continue to do. We’re open sourcing the Superuser Training slides to the community in the hope that any enterprise, WordPress agency, or in-house trainer can take advantage of them as a resource.

The more than 300 slides, including some exercises for students to do directly during the course, are available on GitHub and are released with reveal.js. This means that the HTML version can be presented from any browser, regardless of operating system, and the presentation can be updated by anyone knowing HTML. A brief note about usage to the instructor accompanies an index of the major topics covered in the full-day training course, with accompanying slide numbers so they can be quickly accessed.

An important note: these training materials are not meant to be self-paced or solo training materials. They are meant to be presented by an instructor and additional value-add will be given to the participants through thoughtful explanations and demos as needed.

WordPress.com VIP Superuser Training Slides on GitHub

We’d like the content to continue to improve and grow. If you have additional sections to add, updated screenshots to swap in, or other improvements, feel free to make alterations via pull-request. Like all content on Documattic, the content is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0) license. Check out the Superuser Training course at Documattic on GitHub.

Which WordPress resources or materials should we make available next on GitHub?