Rolling Back / Reverting Changes to Your Theme Using Subversion

Overview #

You can access your theme repository version history and, when necessary, quickly roll back your deployed theme to a previous state.

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The Time Machine #

Every time you commit a change to your theme to your VIP theme repository, Subversion remembers by creating a version. Each of these versions is assigned a unique number and certain other meta, namely: the username of the person who made the version, the date and time of the version, the number of lines of code changed in the version relative to the previous one and a commit message indicating the nature of the changes in the version.

You can inspect your theme’s version history on the command line using the svn log command (documentation: clitortoiseSVN.) Here’s some sample svn log output for Automattic’s test theme on VIP:

vip/test-theme$ svn log .
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r69251 | viper007bond | 2012-06-20 21:09:52 +0000 (Wed, 20 Jun 2012) | 1 line

Remove testing code
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r69209 | batmoo | 2012-06-20 13:59:49 +0000 (Wed, 20 Jun 2012) | 2 lines

auto-deploy: rm image in a subfolder
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r69197 | batmoo | 2012-06-20 13:40:55 +0000 (Wed, 20 Jun 2012) | 2 lines

Auto-deploy: testing a php + css commit
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r66930 | tottdev | 2012-05-27 11:19:52 +0000 (Sun, 27 May 2012) | 1 line

reverting error code

To inspect a commit in more detail (such as seeing the changes it introduced), svn provides the svn diff command (docs: clitortoiseSVN.) Here’s an example:

vip/test-theme$ svn diff -c 17546 .

Index: header.php
===================================================================
--- header.php	(revision 17545)
+++ header.php	(revision 17546)
@@ -6,7 +6,6 @@
 
  
 
-<meta name="generator" content="WordPress "/> 
 
 <link rel="stylesheet" href="?2" type="text/css" media="screen" />
 

The -c flag shows a change set resulting from a single revision, but there are many other options including -r n:m (show differences between revision n and m) and more — see the svn diff documentation for full details.

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Reverting #

If you need to roll back code you’ve committed it to the deploy queue, the quickest way to do this is to revert and commit the code yourself. Here’s how to prepare and push a roll-back:

1. Update your theme’s working copy to the latest revision (use

svn up your-theme

or tortoiseSVN.)

2. Use svn log to find out how far you’d like to roll back. Suppose your log reveals something like:

r4 -- change paint color
r3 -- introduce clunk engine
r2 -- modify blee tag
r1 -- add snorkle

3. Use svn merge to roll back the code to the revision before things went ‘wrong.’ For example, a typical cli command for this would be:

vip/my-theme$ svn merge -c -4 -c -3 .

This “un-does” the commits with version numbers 3 and 4, and rolls the code back to its previous state as of revision 2. As with svn diff, the merge command admits lots of different syntax combinations. You can read about some of those here and here. You can also roll back easily using clients like tortoiseSVN.

4. The merge you just performed has produced a changeset in your working copy. Commit your roll-back like any other change using svn commit.

Make sure that you include an explanatory commit message such as “roll-back of r3 and r4 due to JS error”. Your message should indicate which versions are being rolled back, and for what reason. This will help WordPress.com VIP deploy engineers quickly deploy your changeset.

Pure roll-backs usually require little or no review, and can be deployed almost immediately, so make sure your change only contains the roll-back, and nothing else.

In an emergency situation, you can open an urgent ticket requesting a deploy of your roll-back. Generally this is not necessary, however, and we request that you reserve urgent tickets for when your site is down or for other serious end-user issues.

Best practices:

1. Think in terms of “rolling back” code instead of reverting individual commits. It’s possible to revert things out of sequence. For instance in the previous example we could have reverted r3 but not r4. However, to do so ignores the possibility that something in r4 may depend on something in r3. In almost all cases, it’s safer to roll back all commits in sequence, especially if doing so quickly.

2. Data dependencies. Before a major roll-back it’s good to take a second to consider whether the underlying data has changed in a way that would cause problems with the old code. Have the content or options been modified in any way, including by CLI scripts? This is not usually an issue, but can be in certain cases.

3. Confusingly, subversion also features a command called svn revert whose purpose is not to take your code to a previous state, but only to un-do local un-committed modifications. Therefore we use the term “revert” both in the sense of “roll-back” and the sense of svn revert.

4. Finally, There is an extremely large number of Subversion clients which make all of this very easy. Cornerstone is a great (though somewhat expensive) client for OSX.

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