Scott Taylor on WordPress + Memcached

Scott Taylor, Software Engineer III at eMusic, recently posted a comprehensive article on using WordPress + Memcached.

eMusic relaunched on WordPress a couple of months ago, and it’s great to get Scott’s perspective on a key component of their setup.

Here is a quick blurb, and be sure to go read the full post for all the details:

One of the most bizarre critiques of WordPress that I often hear is “it doesn’t come with caching” – which makes no sense because Cache is one of the best features of WordPress out of the box. That’s kind of like saying: “my iPod sucks because it doesn’t have any songs in it” – when you first buy it. Your iPod can’t predict the future and come pre-loaded with songs you love, and your WordPress environment can’t come already-installed without knowing a minimal number of things. You have to pick a username / password, you have to point at a database, and if you want to cache, you have to pick how you want to cache (you don’t HAVE to cache – but really, you HAVE to cache).

Memcached (pronounced: Mem-cash-dee), or Memcache-daemon, is a process that listens by default on port 11211. Like httpd (H-T-T-P-daemon), it runs in the background, often started automatically on server load. A lot of huge websites use Memcached – at least: Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter.

[Read the full post]

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