Code Review For Teams – Now With Full Transcript

Mo Jangda from Automattic gave a presentation and lead a discussion on Code Review at a recent WordPress Big Media Meetup in New York City now with full transcript. 

So to get a sense of what the room looks like, how many people here are developers? So the majority of people, probably 70-80 per cent. How many people are editorial? A few people, that’s good. How many people are management? You guys in the suits.

If you’re a developer, how many people have a code review process built into their teams right now? Not everyone, which is disappointing. So that’s what I’m here to talk about.

The goal should be to have at least one other person than the person who wrote the code look it over and to review it for things like quality standards, security concerns and performance and so on, things like that.

You can’t code review if you’re doing it live. So, ultimately the goal with code review is basically to improve the quality of your code.

So if you’re editorial, right, the idea is that you’re not going to push something out any sort of published articles without going through the copy editing phase, unless you care about money, in which case you don’t care.

You want to make sure the stuff you’re putting out is good quality, and that’s where code review is – that’s why it’s sort of nice to do.

The goal should be to have at least one other person than the person who wrote the code look it over and to review it for things like quality standards, security concerns and performance and so on, things like that.

So it doesn’t necessarily have to be a junior to senior. It’s a learning opportunity for both, different skill sets as well.

And the secondary goal is you sort of becomes that you’re learning from each other as developers. It doesn’t necessarily have to be a junior developer passing off their work to a senior developer and them telling them basically everything they did wrong.

It can actually go the other way where a senior developer passes off their work to a junior developer and says here’s the code I’ve written,can you look it over and see what I’m doing?

It gives the junior developer an opportunity to look at how the code is being written by the senior developer and learn from them, right?

So it doesn’t necessarily have to be a junior to senior. It’s a learning opportunity for both, different skill sets as well.

The other thing to sort of keep in mind is that code reviews shouldn’t be something else that you tack on. It’s part of the development process, right?

So it’s not something that you should consider a tedious thing that should be going on, it’s something that you should have built into your processes as part of your deployment, as part of your coding, so something you do on a regular basis.

There’s different ways you can do code review obviously. You can have a gatekeeper-type approach. Where you have one person who’s sort of like master of the code review, so every bit of code that gets written goes through that person.

So that person can be a senior person, can be a rotator role so all code goes to that person, they review it, send feedback and iterate on the code that way.

One flow, or one specific approach to code review is not going to work for everyone. So you’ve got to find something that works for you.

You can do some things like peer review, where you have teams of developers put together, so one person is buddied up with another so any time a person needs feedback, anytime a person is finished working on a patch or working on a new feature they can pass it off to their fellow developer and say, hey can you give me feedback.

You can have a committee-based approach, where you have multiple people giving feedback on patches. If you’re using something like Git or GitHub you can use pull requests. GitHub makes it really easy to comment on code, and pull requests and commenting and so on.

You can also do pair programming, which I personally dislike, but it works for a lot of people if you’re into extreme programming or agile processes and stuff like that. You can have people working on code at the same time and the cool feature of that is that you’re essentially doing code review live because you’re questioning each other as you’re writing code.

One person types up something, the other person sort of questions: Okay, why did you write that?

There’s different points in time where you can actually use code review so you can actually start doing code review before writing a single piece of code and you’re essentially talking out the concepts with each other.

You know, we planned out the specs and functionality, we’ve thought about what my classes are going to look like, what my functions are going to look like.

So it’s a good opportunity to actually talk with you, what approach you’re taking to code review, to talk with the person with whom you’re doing the code review to see you know, does this make sense?

Obviously you do things like pre-commit reviews, look at patches, so before you even commit the code send the patch over, send over and review it that way.

It’s a great way for your team to actually write better code and build a more cohesive unit.

We also do post-commits, so once the changes are done, committed, you can review the pull request or the actual committed code.

You can also do post-deploy, so if you don’t actually have time, to do a full code review before pushing it out, you can still go back and do code review on stuff that’s pushed live and make changes over time.

The most important thing obviously is you got to find a flow that sort of works for your team.

So one flow, or one specific approach to code review is not going to work for everyone. So you’ve got to find something that works for you.

Doesn’t necessarily have to be anything very specific. It can be sort of totally casual, like a conversation between two developers.

So it’s pretty important to find something that works for you. You also don’t need fancy tools, you don’t necessarily need to go out and get your own license of Phabricator, which is a code review tool that Facebook has built up.

To be honest, it can just be as simple as two developers passing around a patch to each other. Looking it over.

So it doesn’t have to be complex, but if you want it to be complex, you can.

But you can keep it simple, find something that works for you and so on. When it actually comes to doing the code review, there’s a few things to keep in mind.

Throw your ego out the door.

The most important thing, and this goes for both the person reviewing the code and the person receiving feedback is throw your ego out the door.

There’s no such thing as ego and emotion during code review. That’s the most important thing to keep in mind.

The reviewer is not smarter or dumber than the person whose code they’re reviewing. In the same sense, the person whose code is being reviewed they’re at the same level. So ego is not involved, it’s not supposed to be personal. It’s supposed to basically be about questioning the code, right?

Not questioning the person. So one thing that I usually try to keep in mind while I’m personally reviewing code is that I usually recommend to people is that when you’re phrasing your feedback never include the word “you” .

So it’s not YOUR code, it’s THE code. Right? So that takes away the personal aspect of it and it makes the reviewer feel less attacked.

Because getting your code reviewed can be a very scary thing, but it shouldn’t be.

You should get to a point, where you should actually be proud to have your code reviewed and proud of the code you’re presenting to your teammate, senior developer or boss and so on.

To show that this is the amazing thing that I’ve done, and you know what, I expect there to be flaws.

Chances are, there might not be, but you know, if there are issues with it, it’s something you know, the mistakes that you find, is something that I can learn from.

The other thing to sort of keep in mind, is that you as a reviewer want to be critical about things, right? So question the decision that the developer is making.

Why did they name that variable that way? Is that a valid variable name, right? Why is this function name so long? Can this be abstracted? Right? So design decisions like that can be a good way to root out potential problems in the code.

But obviously, you don’t want to get too caught up in the minor details, so getting caught up on spaces over tabs which we’ve had problems in the past with before, in VIP, where some developers would reject code commits for using space instead of tabs, you know that’s a minor implementation don’t get too caught up on that.

Point it out, but it’s not going to be a blocker. But it’s important that coding standards and best practices are still followed, so it’s important that your team is following those that in your reviews, you’re actually flagging those and so on.

The other thing to keep in mind is as a reviewer, don’t worry about catching everything. ‘Cause you’re not. I don’t mean to brag, but I think I’ve reviewed about 20,000 commits on VIP. Of the many commits that I’ve reviewed on VIP there’s been stuff that I’ve missed and that’s naturally going to happen.

Because manual code review is not going to be perfect. Automated code review is not going to be perfect.

There’s no such thing as ego and emotion during code review. That’s the most important thing to keep in mind.

Things will get missed, things will go live that will break your site. But that’s, an opportunity to learn from so the next time you review your code you’re going to be extra conscious about it and try to find that mistake that you made and try and prevent it from happening again.

So that’s the other thing as a reviewee, you should sort of keep in mind. When a mistake is found, and pointed out to you, you should try and avoid making that mistake again. It’s a very important thing. You should be using it as a learning opportunity, right?

If you are making the same mistake over and over again. Chances are there’s something wrong. Either with your processes or with how you’re developing. That’s something you should work to change.

Never focus on the negatives.

As a reviewer, if you find the same problems over and over again, that’s when you need to question what’s going on with this developer? Why are they not sort of picking up the problems that I’m seeing? Another thing I sort of do, and I mentioned this earlier with not making it personal, try to keep in mind try to stick to the positives, right?

Never focus on the negatives. What’s a good example? It’s important to start a phrase with: How can we do this better? Instead of this is dumb, this is stupid.

So again, avoiding the personal attacks, trying avoid getting too emotional about things and staying focused on this code could be optimized more instead of this code will break your site, things like that.

I think that just about covers it. That’s sort of one of the biggest things I wanted to go over. But also, I guess it’s ultimately important to find something that works for you.

Code review is, it’s something that’s near and dear to my heart because I’ve been doing it for the past three years as a reviewer, it’s the best way to learn best practices and learn new code.

I’ve actually learned more new WordPress functions by looking at other people’s code than I have through just following news and following WordPress codex and things like that.

So it’s a great opportunity for reviewers to sort of look at how other people code or how other people think when they’re approaching problems.

And as a reviewee, it’s a humbling experience and a great opportunity to learn. And ultimately, it’s a great way for your team to actually write better code and build a more cohesive unit to ultimately do cool stuff.

Thank you.

Q: It’s easy to think that if you don’t review everything, then you should just give up because if you’re not reviewing everything, then the problem is going to be in the spot you didn’t review.

So, I think that maybe some of the thought process behind not everyone here doing code reviews I think it’s something that I think everyone wants to do so I was wondering if you could provide tips is there any sort of lightweight code review process? Is there anything that doesn’t require every commit to be reviewed by somebody else?

A: So that’s where I would look at post-deploy commits or post-deploy reviews so reviews don’t necessarily have to block things from going out but you still take the opportunity to go back at some point.

Let’s say you have a work week, you set aside two hours in the week Friday or something where you as a team, get together and review each other’s code, and look at various commits and stuff.

So to give you an example, on WordPress.com, the platform, we have about a 120 or so developers. I may be fudging our numbers. We have a lot of developers pushing out code daily. We probably have anywhere from 60 to 100 to 200 commits going out every single day and we haven’t really actually found a good mix, or good flow for us what makes sense for a code review.

So we end up relying on post-deploy code reviews where the idea is certain developers will take some time on the side, a couple hours a day, a couple of hours a week to sort of look, skim through commits that people have done.

They’ll just look through the log to see a commit message or if there’s a particular feature they’re interested in or that they’ve worked on in the past to sort of give it a quick skim and see if there’s something that they can flag for the developer to work on.

So it doesn’t necessarily have to be a very time intensive or blocking process. Ideally, you want to get to a point where it does become integrated into your development flow but it doesn’t necessarily have to.

To be honest, spending even an hour a week is a perfect starting point.

Q: Is there a good size team for doing code review? Like if you have fewer people,are there better methods? Like for smaller teams, to do it so it’s not interfering, so it’s not just like back and forth constantly?

A: Again depends on your type of workflow and your team dynamic.

In that case, it’s like if you’re using like Git for example it’s a simple pull request is probably a great way to go.

If you’re working on a feature, send a pull request and have the guy sitting beside you say can you take a quick scan. Or if there are specific things that you are worried about, have them look it over and point out specific things.

Like I’m not really sure about this particular function, I’m not sure about how this class interacts with this feature, can you just take a look at it.

So it doesn’t necessarily have to be you’re reviewing the whole commit, just skimming through something and seeing if anything jumps out.

Participant: I have a small addition. So one thing that I find really helps out if you have a definition of the process so for example if you have code review documentation, like what kind of code structure you need to keep, templates defaults you need to use also speeds up a lot of reviews because you can automatically assume the person is following the structure, because they technically know about it.

The easy way to speed it up is to also just I mean ignore JavaScript and CSS, because if you have a lot you can just ignore CSS. If your quality assurance team passes it and it looks fine, also JavaScript if you really don’t have time.

A: I mean for CSS especially, as a code reviewer when I look at the VIP code, I basically ignore CSS, because from my perspective, I care more about the security and performance.

So you’re right, there are things you can sort of ignore, if you are a designer and like reviewing CSS, then go for it. But also, like you said, standards are really important, and processes are really important.

Especially, as you grow as a team, again doesn’t necessarily have to be super formal and super strict, but it helps to have some sort of definition in place so you can follow, your team knows what to do.

So they’re actually trying to have their code reviewed, instead of pushing it live.

Steph: Out of curiosity, how many people here have had Mo review their code?

Participant: He’s the best!

How many of you have had code rejected by me?

Participant: How many people want to beat Mo up after this meetup?

Participant:I’m in

Participant: Actually out code was reverted 2 min before the meetup.

What I usually tell people at like VIP workshops and stuff is that your ultimate goal should be to make me so happy that I would never want to revert that code ever.

We actually revert code once a day. The interesting thing is that if you have some sort of code review process, we actually notice when VIP’s adopt some sort of code review process, internally, so they have someone on their team review their code before it comes to us.

The quality, there’s a significant increase. The number of issues we have to flag, the number of reverts that actually end up happening to that code goes significantly down.

It’s a testament that code review can actually work and keep us happy and keep your code getting deployed much faster.

If you’re not on VIP, still a great opportunity to make sure your team is working together, make sure your team is writing good code. ‘Cause the last thing you want is to push out a security hole and all of a sudden has your homepage hacked the Syrian army or whatever.

See the presentations from previous Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetups. For Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup groups in other cities, see the full list on VIP Events and join your local group. 

Want more information about WordPress services for media or enterprise sites? Get in touch.

USA Today’s World Cup – Now With Full Transcript

Ephraim Gregor from USA Today presented “World Cup and WordPress.com VIP”  at a recent Big Media & Enterprise Meetup in New York City, now with full transcript. 

Hi everyone, I’m Ephraim and I’m from USA Today Sports media group. USA Today Sports Media Group is basically a subgroup within the USA Today proper, and we formed about two, two and a half years ago with the purpose of essentially improving and consolidating USA Today’s fairly extensive sports offerings.

Now, when we first started that when we first started that, basically we looked at all our current acquisitions, as we acquired a lot of little many one off, that we thought would be a good acquisition.

It had some interesting moments and so we essentially looked to WordPress for both unified code,easy to use editorial tools a good plugin architecture.

We first of all looked at the code base which was basically pretty much everything under the sun and more and decided that we needed to consolidate, improve and move to one code base. It had some interesting moments and so we essentially looked to WordPress for both unified code, easy to use editorial tools a good plugin architecture and after developing some independent WordPress, we then moved to VIP.

VIP basically allows us to spin up very rapidly and develop across one central theme which we call Lawrence and develop many many small sort of look and feels that we develop and integrate and display modular systems within the WordPress.

We first of all looked at the code base which was basically pretty much everything under the sun and more and decided that we needed to consolidate, improve and move to one code base.

As it says, we have 3-6 styles and we’re adding more every single project with additional integrations as we go on. Sports, specifically, as a data-driven architecture is essentially, interesting because not-only do we have the sort of standard article content-driven approach, we also have to deal with fact that we are trying to deliver, ideally, real-time data about every single sporting event we’re going to report.

In general, right now, our platforms tend to be divided into specific sub categories so we have to have one platform that can deliver soccer, one platform that delivers baseball, one platform that delivers fighting stuff.

So that’s certainly a challenge. So what we’ve done is essentially built off a central theme with multiple plugins to then allow us to turn on and off various sorts of external systems that can deliver this data into the WordPress flow and then deliver that to our users.

So recently I was the lead dev on the World Cup offering we have put up for obviously a sporting event that’s happening right now. What that was, was interesting for several reasons.

First of all, we had to integrate both vendor and internal data to display that with the latest scores, articles, stuff like that. We also had to basically develop a system in place to allow us to display that to the users while maintaining editorial control over that.

A lot of the data was driven by third-party vendor based out of the UK. We also had the problem of essentially turning this into one of our first hub sites. By which I mean, we have a lot of content spread throughout our network. and we wanted to basically flow that content into our own, into World Cup, while also maintaining the fact that these are external links to their own sites and maintaining that sort of multiple umbrella we have.

So what we ended up doing is leveraging both VIP’s offerings and our own, to extend to plugins and syndication things, to build that out into an experience for users that would allow essentially the mobile WordPress flow of content generated by authors directly syndicated to the user, into content distributed across all of our sites both WordPress and non-WordPress and display to the user within the whole post flow, while allowing the user to go to that and go to an external site.

It was interesting. Other things we implemented was also basically increased sort of data migration we had because we basically had the challenge of both integrating the vendor, as mentioned as well as our own data, which we get from various vendors, editorial-driven, code, all bits and bobs.

Generally, the general architecture approach we take for data is to have it stored in external databases and have that be their own CMS that we manage internally as opposed to trying to put that within the WordPress architecture.

We also are starting to move slowly onto other divisions within USA Today, and are seeing a good thing and wanting to get a slice of that pie.

While there is some content that definitely fits, like the custom post types, taxonomies and stuff like that, generally for sports data that’s somewhat unwieldy. So we generally prefer to spin up our own either Mongo or MySQL based solutions.

So our goals going forward is to basically continue operating and migrating our solutions onto the WordPress VIP platform I don’t know the exact count of sites we have right now. I think it’s either between 15 and 20 with more spinning up every week.

We also are starting to move slowly onto other divisions within USA Today, and are seeing a good thing and wanting to get a slice of that pie.

So we are moving Life, Entertainment, that sort of thing as well. Obviously none of this affects, like if you go to USAToday.com. As a whole, that is not WordPress, that might be something in the future. But right now it is a separate platform, but there’s a lot of little subsections that are very much looking and keen on the WordPress as a platform.

We’re also continuing to improve Lawrence as keeping that as a core modular theme, which we’re iterating off and adding new sort of API integrations for our own content and data driven by others, and we’re pretty sure that we can develop pretty much anything within this platform.

So I’m out of time but I will take questions now.

Q: Brad from Alley Interactive, what’s Lawrence named after?

A: Lawrence is named after, it was developed by a bunch of guys in the LA office originally, and apparently there was a vendor who just randomly runs into the building and offered sandwiches and his name was Lawrence. I don’t know what to make of that, as a member of the New York office, but it is what it is, any other questions?

Q: How do you interact this USA Today sports group with the other properties?

A: Reasonably siloed. We obviously have some dealings with the other offerings as well as the USA Today central group, but as I said, most of the sports stuff is a little bit outside of that field. Certainly our biggest integration is moving basically flowing content across both all WordPress sports media group offerings into the other systems and vice-versa, so that’s our biggest integration and we’re looking for like similar sort of promotional stuff like syndication, stuff like that as well.

Is there any other questions?

Q: Rohit from Forbes, so obviously you’re using WordPress on the backend, so first question is WordPress also feeding the front-end of the sports system?

A: Yes.

Q: And then you mentioned other divisions within USA Today are also looking to make the move over…The main USA Today website using php or something?

A: The main USA Today website is actually a system not too dissimilar from yours actually. I believe that we have a proprietary CMSin it, I believe an ASP, that drives a front-end based off of Django.

Q: So now as you’re looking to move some of the divisions over, is that going to be an API system to connect with them or is it going to end up being completely moved over to WordPress?

A: We are actively working on an integration system to sort of marry the two systems together. Presto is what it’s called. The main USA Today CMS is architectured with an API that we can use, and that’s something we’re definitely looking to utilize for our other divisions. It really depends.

I don’t believe there’s any call to use WordPress exclusively as the front-end facing instead of Presto, that does fairly well architectured out for us to use that site. However, we do have people looking into trying to spin up their own sort of mini sub groups with more exclusive content and that is definitely looking to pull in with Presto and WordPress-driven data to use on the front-end and that is generally hosted by WordPress.

Anyone else?

Q: Hey, James, Athletics, I was curious just if you could rattle off some of the other sites running on this?

A: Sure, let’s see, our oldest one is For The Win, which is, which originally was the one we launched originally to cast WordPress as a platform in general.

It was not VIP and it was self hosted on Amazon and that was fun. We also have the […] Entertain This, we have College, we have High School Sports, which actually just launched. We have America’s Markets, we have […] and a few others that are currently in development. I actually don’t know off the top of my head the entire list.

Q: […] The other divisions looking to use WordPress, is that really driven by your group, your developers?

A: A combination of both, we originally chose WordPress for it’s ease of editorial
and for it’s ease of editorial tools and our editorial department was so enthusiastic about that, so once that started going, we as developers preferred this as a platform as we felt it was more modular and our group drove it and the editorial folks within our division also wished to continue using WordPress as a platform choice.

Even though there was obviously some hiccups along the way, about various capabilities but you know, we continue to extend our Lawrence to basically cover anything needed. Just so I’m clear, USA Today Sports media group actually contains both editorial and engineering, we’re not engineering exclusive.

Any other questions?

Q: Matthew, Athletics, when you talk about integrating Sports, […] Mongo DB, are you ingesting that in PHP or on the front-end?

A: Generally php, we haven’t really had a need yet to have to do our own live streaming front-end, which would obviously means we couldn’t use like caching like WordPress would provide, so that is something we’ll definitely do in the future. But for now, most of the data we’re ingesting, if not like vendor-driven, widget-type thing, is just generally in the php, but with the VIP server calls.

Q: Steve, the question is are you unifying your archives?

A: Um, I don’t believe at the moment. Potentially, generally, correct me if I’m wrong, most of the stuff, we’ve done so far has been very like trendy, up to date, we’ve seen like 30-40 articles published in a single day. So what’s old generally isn’t considered that much. I mean obviously as we move more and more of the main USA Today platform and that sort of stuff on to VIP, moving content from that system that we already have onto WordPress it’s something we’d definitely consider. But right now, it’s just not a priority.

Q: Let me ask a follow up question. Even in the active system (…) when you eventually […] content, do you keep that or flush it out?

A: We don’t get rid of them, we tend to have tentpole sites, which is World Cup is a great example. We have an event, World Cup 2014, and we put it up. Obviously it’s just really useful for World Cup 2014, but we don’t get rid of that content. Generally the strategy right now is keep the actual site archived and continue to iterate. We would probably eventually have a more hub-based solution which would have that old content flowed in,
using our existing tools to pull and manipulate content across our VIP offerings.

Anything else?

Going once, going twice.

Thank you very much.

 

See the presentations from previous Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetups. For Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup groups in other cities, see the full list on VIP Events and join your local group. 

Want more information about WordPress services for media or enterprise sites? Get in touch.

Pre-Registration for the WordPress.com VIP Workshop 2015 is now open!

The next edition of the WordPress.com VIP Workshop will be May 4-7, 2015! We announced the event to clients weeks ago, and pre-registration for the event is now open! 

Do you run a large-scale WordPress site with millions of pageviews per month? Are you interested in optimizing and scaling up your enterprise site, and utilizing the latest WordPress features for your content? Do you want to share best practices, code shortcuts, and lessons learned with other VIPs?

The next WordPress.com Intensive VIP Developer Workshop will take place in May 2015, and this three-day event will include a packed curriculum for VIP developers with expert instructors from Automattic, the makers of WordPress.com.

vipworkshoplogo

The Intensive VIP Developer Workshop provides a unique opportunity to learn from the WordPress.com VIP team in person, as well as exchange ideas and experiences with other WordPress.com VIP clients and partners through networking lunches and dinners, in-depth WordPress curriculum and exercises, and focused, collaborative conversations.

You’ll hear from other big brands and enterprises through flash talk sessions where WordPress.com VIPs will share their own experiences with building VIP-scale websites using WordPress, their workflows, shortcuts, lessons learned, and best practices, too.

We continue to receive great feedback on the VIP Workshop from attendees, and last year’s feedback was excellent:

  • 100% of participants surveyed said they would recommend the conference to their colleagues and
  • 92.68% said they would come again!

A quick peek at the itinerary – details & agenda will be continually updated on the WordPress.com VIP Workshop page, and we’ll be returning to The Carneros Inn in Napa, California.

  • May 4th: Arrival in the afternoon. Welcome, networking reception & dinner.
  • May 5-6th: Full days of training with VIP instructors, followed by networking dinners.
  • May 7th: Wrap-up, farewell breakfast, and morning departures.

Register now and take advantage of early bird pricing! Early bird pricing is set at $3,250 each until January 31st. After which, the full participant price will raise to $3,600.

If you’re interested in attending in 2015, just fill out the pre-registration form here or send in a ticket to VIP Support. We’ll work with you on organizing payment and confirming your registration for the event.

WordPress.com VIP Acquires Code For The People

Code For The People is a six-person WordPress development agency based in the UK, known for their great service and the enterprise tools they’ve created. Automattic has acquired them and will be winding down the consulting part of their business as they join our WordPress.com VIP team to continue building the best tools and services for enterprises using WordPress.

We’ve worked very closely with Simon Dickson, Simon Wheatley, and the rest of the Code For The People team in recent years as partners collaborating on projects for our mutual customers, and before that through their many contributions to the WordPress open-source project and community.

They bring a deep understanding of WordPress, unique experience providing solutions for government agencies, and a particular specialty developing multilingual tools, like Babble, for enterprises. We also really appreciate their commitment to contributing back to WordPress, and are excited to have John Blackbourn continue leading the development of WordPress 4.1 as part of Automattic.

And while Automattic has always been a distributed company, and WordPress.com VIP a global team, we’re excited to expand coverage for our European customers as well.

Congrats to the team, and welcome to the Automattic family!

Building Political Sites and Gearing up for the Elections on WordPress

Ahead of the upcoming U.S. midterm elections in November, we spoke with Ben Ostrower, Principal and Creative Director of Wide Eye Creative, a creative web design & development studio who has built some of the recent entries of high profile WordPress sites in the government space. 

Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee

Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee

Why WordPress? There are so many players in the CMS space, especially in the political realm, why do you choose WordPress as your go-to software?

When I started Wide Eye, we were doing almost exclusively work with Drupal. It filled a lot of our client’s needs and it’s a great tool for some purposes, but it was always cumbersome. The way Drupal was built, it just kept imposing limits on design, which, as a designer, was incredibly frustrating. My developers would always say: “no, it’s really hard to do that because it’s not the way ‘xyz’ module is built”. It was as though the materials we were using to build a house were guiding the design and architecture, not the other way around.

When I first started trying WordPress in early 2010 or so, it was already fairly mature and I wondered immediately why I hadn’t been using it earlier. The structure of it was just incredibly intuitive to me – as though it had been created by designers, not just developers. Suddenly it became much more possible to realize my own creative vision for a project.

On top of it, and almost more importantly, it was more user-friendly for our clients. People would just immediately “get” the interface and how content can be controlled and structured. I saw clients generally become more self-sufficient with the management of their own sites, and our exposure to followup questions, bug-fixes and hand-holding went way down. Since then, while we’ve used Drupal for a handful of select database projects, we’ve used WordPress for literally everything else – every campaign site we’ve done since 2010 has been on WordPress. It’s been a great marriage.

Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi

Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi

What can you do using WordPress that you can’t do using locked-down / proprietary software, like NationBuilder?

We pride ourselves on intimately tailoring each site to a project’s goals. WordPress, especially with the Advanced Custom Fields plugin integrated, gives us the ability to deliver really granular control over page templates to a client — i.e. turning a banner image on and off, changing the color of a button, toggling the positioning of elements, the list goes on…Plus, we have a wealth of excellent plugins available to us that we can use to quickly extend functionality. Ultimately, when we train clients on the backend of their site, we consistently hear them say: “Wow. I’ve never had that level of control before.” That level of customization just isn’t as possible with a proprietary framework. NationBuilder is an impressive tool and a good solution for some campaigns, but, for us, it’s really analogous to the difference between a fully bespoke suit versus tailoring a suit purchased off the rack.

You have a great client list and you work with some high profile politicians. What sites have you done that are most exciting to you?

We love all of our clients – that’s not hyperbole, but the most exciting ones are when we work with a campaign or organization that trusts us as a creative partner and is willing to take risks and try new things. Brandon English and his great team at the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, for example, actively collaborated with us to innovate the way stale old email sign up forms have worked for years. Now a multi-field form operates in the space of a single input field, sending the input data to Blue State Digital’s tools with each click forward instead of form fields stacked one on top of another with a big button below. As a client, they truly understood the value of user friendliness and the capacity that good design has to fuel better, more successful results.

Chris Coons’ Senate campaign in Delaware is another client that worked with us on something that we call a “smart website” – calls to action that change for a user based on their prior engagement with the campaign. That was really fun.

Our other great scenario, as least from a design perspective, is where we have the challenge of striking a difficult creative balance for a client: i.e. “we want to look simultaneously polished and savvy, but also modest and grassroots”, “conservative and classical, but also innovative and cutting-edge”, etc… That’s always fun.

U.S. Senator Chris Coons

U.S. Senator Chris Coons

Do you have any tips and tricks to share that could help other developers and designers who are building websites in the area of politics and non-profit?

  1. Don’t approach political and non-profit projects with any less of a standard of quality than you would for a corporate client like Nike or Apple. Quality matters. Audiences are more sensitive and savvy than ever before to design and functionality – when something is subpar (doesn’t look good or doesn’t work the way a user expects), it diminishes the campaign’s or organization’s message.
  2. KISS: Keep It Simple Stupid – one of the first things you learn in filmmaking class. Keep your message simple and your actions focused. By packing lots of information and options in a small space, you’re diminishing the impact of everything.
  3. Don’t be afraid to provoke emotion with your designs – you’re appealing to a visitor to take action. You can’t just expect them to click a donate button because it’s there, you need to tell them “why”.
  4. Interaction matters. With the rise of CSS3 and HTML5 over the last several years, use animation to give visitors the sense that the website is alive and responsive. Buttons should react when you hover, form fields should highlight, etc.
Senator Kirsten Gillibrand's Off The Sidelines

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand’s Off The Sidelines

Look 5-10 years into the future – what do you think the future will look like when it comes to technology in politics, campaigns and in the government arena?

1. Websites, ads and apps will continue to become smarter. Messages and calls to action will be more and more targeted and segmented based on a visitor’s profile. By 2016, the era of visitors all receiving the same general, default call-to-action on a website landing page will be over.

2. Mobile will continue to become even more important. Designers and developers will need to stay ahead of the curve on that.

3. Ads, emails and appeals for people to take action and donate will only become more and more ubiquitous. There are going to be more and smarter ways to reach people.

4. Not that it’s not happening already, but digital campaigns will be more and more driven by data, analytics and math.

Mark Dayton, Governor of Minnesota

Mark Dayton, Governor of Minnesota

What new technology are you using that you’re most excited about? 

There are a lot of technologies that we’re keeping a close eye on. We’re really excited to play with NGP VAN’s new API, and we’d really like to be building more around Google’s open source civic tools.

My incredibly talented Lead Developer (and JavaScript Ninja) Nick Cerminara considers the JSON API WordPress Plugin the most exciting WordPress technology we’ve been toying with lately. With it, we’re able to do any WP_Query and get a nice and pretty JSON endpoint with almost no custom work involved. This is huge for application development because it allows us to leverage WordPress as an out-of-the-box backend. Down the road, this makes using Front-End Frameworks like Angular JS a lot more practical with WordPress where they’re typically intended only for single page applications. Combining these is going to bring a whole new and unprecedented liveliness to WordPress sites.

Thank you to Ben – to learn more about Wide Eye Creative or to see some more case studies, please visit their website! Visit the WordPress.com VIP site for more information about WordPress in Government or get in touch.

21 Product Guidelines Forged While Growing Metro.Co.Uk 400%

In this post, WordPress.com VIP Cloud Hosting client Metro.co.uk‘s Head of Development Dave Jensen shares further insights on how their popular site achieved an incredible growth since its migration and launch on WordPress.com VIP. Originally posted on his blog, he’s agreed to share it here on VIP News as well. 

metro-quarterly-monthly-unique-traffic-growth

For the last two years I have been focused on the design, build and growth of Metro.co.uk utilising the WordPress.com VIP platform. Our approach consists of constant experimentation with both product and content which has returned a large set of data mixed with editorial feedback. This has been refined into a list of product guidelines to help us remain focused on growth. These are based on my experiences and our audience so yours may differ.

Good editorial content will deliver more growth than any product based approach

With a single well written/planned/timed story able to deliver millions of page views and course through the veins of social networks for weeks this should be the number one focus.

Good UX turns the dial more than any product hacks

The better the experience of product and content the more likely people are to visit your site, share your content and form habits around its consumption.

The closer to the main content area of the page the more related the content should be

Our data has shown that the closer to the article body or top of channel pages the better contextually related content perfoms. Once you are below these areas users are more open to a wider set of content to continue their journey.

Where content is placed on the page is almost as important as the content that is placed there

Our testing revealed content placement is almost as important as content selection (as long as it is relevant and recent). This is one of the reasons we have moved to an algorithmic approach for large areas of the site.

  • Nothing beats the value of an editorially selected contextual link within the article body
  • The area just after article delivers a lot of value as users have finished reading and can be easily tempted into something else
  • Sidebars aren’t shown on mobile and banner blindness often turns them off for desktop users so they are not an area we focus on

Fill dead space with content, people like to scroll it’s the natural behaviour of the web

Our newsfeed delivers over 10% of the page views of our site, this is pretty impressive considering it used to be blank space at the bottom of every article and channel page.

Don’t mess with the natural way that the web works

We tried and failed with this during our swipe phase. 5-7% of users delivered 20% of our page views but that didn’t increase their overall time on site. However it complicated everything we built hampering our ability to learn fast. It also didn’t quite fit into commercial or editorial strategies. This frustration/learning was what inspired the algorithm and scroll based newsfeed you now see.

Algorithms are great but need help from humans to perform at their best

Simple algorithms are a great way to optimise editorial workflows especially around content positioning. However these are only as good as the data behind them. Often you have to wait for this to be gathered before acting on it. Using editorial intuition is a great way to shortcut this process. Especially if you can make it run off existing priorities then process change isn’t required to participate.

Whatever Google/Facebook ask you to do, just do it

They deliver so much of your traffic don’t question, just do what they recommend.

Feed the beast

Google and Facebook are always hungry for quality content. Gaining momentum requires constant feeding. They both have overall scores for domain as well as article urls so focusing on keeping this high means a better chance to gain and then maintain momentum.

Think of every page as a funnel, you lose users as they scroll but the lower they get the more open to their next engagement they become

The higher up the page something is placed the more people will see it. However the lower down the page someone is the more open they are to being tempted by some more content, advertising or interactions (e.g. poll vote, comments)

A mobile first approach is a great way to approach product prioritisation

Most of our traffic comes from mobile rather than desktop so it is logical to prioritise. This has formed a major part of our growth strategy.

Goals need to be concise, measurable and focus on why

The more people understand the goal and are able to affect it the more powerful it is. A goal that contains a why will always beat a goal that just contains a what.

Product specific performance should be broken down to actions per daily active users for comparison

This gives a much better overview of actual performance. Allows you to take out traffic fluctuations, just make sure you have enough data.

A week seems to be the minimum amount of data required to see if a feature has worked

Due to fluctuations in traffic and browsing habits. Also good to look at monthly and quarterly trends over longer periods as quite often they exhibit patterns that aren’t found at lower levels. It was asking questions around unexpected trends/data that helped teach me most around product growth.

Distribute weekly reports to show trends and give your stakeholders an overview of how the product is performing

Have these scheduled to your team and stakeholders via email. Also very useful if you break something when fixing something else. Great safety net to minimise impact and spot any unexpected growth.

Any new feature needs to be taken in context of how it fits in the editorial work flow. The closer it is to the existing process the more likely it will be adopted.

The best way to change a habit is build off an existing trigger. New features that leverage existing habits will get much higher adoption than building new habits/process.

Consider the users current journey and their emotional state in all features

Segmenting users based on mindset is a great way to understand data. e.g. Social browsers are likely on a multi site journey in a chromed browser on a mobile device. So they are only looking for a single story from your site so optimise for that. No point in worrying about pages/visit focus on getting more return visits via a social follow.

When coming from social users are often looking to enhance their social status

Our top share buttons get clicked on 4 times more than our bottom share buttons. Social proof around number of others already shared also promotes more sharing.

When coming from search users are usually in a topic based mindset

More likely to click on related, in article links and masthead channel links. Continue to deliver great content around a niche to form habits. Particularly useful around passion centres e.g. Premier League clubs.

It’s better to have 100 amazing tag pages that look and feel like a destination than 10,000 that feel like they were made for Google

Quality trumps quantity every time, Google knows if you users are clicking through.

People click on headlines 4x more than they click images

This is why A/B testing headlines is a great idea. It is the single piece of the editorial process that can have the biggest impact on growth. We also have SEO and socially optimised headlines to ensure we cater to both needs.

These are the principles that I have applied to the product development of metro.co.uk over the past two years. The key takeaway is that constant experimentation is a great way to unlock growth if your environment supports it. The hard part is achieving that without adding too much complexity. Complexity inhibits your ability to learn and learning is central to any successful product growth strategy. Building a set of guidelines has enabled us to move faster and helped foster our continued growth.

One for the future.

Micro interactions help drive habitual use

We don’t have a lot of data on this yet but there seems to be a correlation between micro interactions such as poll votes and habitual use. My theory is that by engaging different parts of the brain you become more memorable. These simple actions form the basis of new habits around content consumption. I think this is a major opportunity for future growth.

Thank you to Dave and the Metro.co.uk team for sharing their tips with VIP News.

Want more information about WordPress services for your enterprise site? Get in touch.

Why Choose WordPress: A Government Perspective – Now With Full Transcript

WordPress.com VIP Director of Platform Services, Peter Slutsky, presented to the DigitalGov University about using WordPress CMS to build government websites, along with Dan Munz, from the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau, last year, now published with full transcript. 

DigitalGov is brought to you by the Office of Citizen Services and Innovative Technologies in the U.S. General Services Administration and their job is to help government agencies build a 21st century digital government.

“Can WordPress be a full-fledged CMS? Our experience is absolutely yes, it can.” — Dan Munz, Deputy Assistant Director for Consumer Engagement at Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

In this presentation you’ll learn:

  • How to determine if WordPress is a good option for your agency
  • The important technical considerations
  • The biggest challenges and successes CFPB had with implementing WordPress
  • The resources you’ll need to implement it and keep it sustainable
  • How to get buy-in and make the business case to switch/choose WordPress
  • And a Q&A from the attendees

Below is the video of the presentation: 

Good morning everyone, thanks for joining us for the second event in the Why Choose series.

Our first event featured why you might choose Drupal as your content management system or CMS and this event of course will focus on WordPress. Before we begin, I’d like to introduce our presenters.

First up we’ll have Peter Slutsky, he’s the director of platform services at Automattic, where he focuses on expanding the WordPress footprint in politics, government and nonprofit arenas. We’ll also have Dan Munz, who’s the product director for consumerfinance.gov at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which is the Flagship digital property, and he’s responsible for leading the daily of product-focused web team, articulating prodict priorities, and a release roadmap and shepherding individual digital products like the Bureau’s online knowledge base at CFPB.

So with that, I’ll hand it over to Peter.

Peter: Thank you, I feel like I’m going live on the Today Show.  So first of all, everyone welcome. Thank You so much for joining us this morning. My name is Peter Slutsky. I’m very excited to be with you guys. Let me quickly give you a little background on who I am and what I’m doing here, then I’m going to take you through just a couple slides and then you an overview of WordPress and some of the work that I’m doing to expand the WordPress footprint in Government.

So I started my career working in politics, and lived in DC for a long time. In those roles, I worked in new media, back when new media was actually new and in communications and some organizing on some campaigns. And in about 2007, I got connected to the folks that were launching  causes on Facebook, and I was a consultant for them which kind of opened up a whole new world of technology and the intersection of technology and digita and politics, which was kind of perfect for my past experience. I went to work for a company called Ming, which was doing some really cool things early on in social networking on and went to an early stage start up which led me to Automattic and WordPress, which has been phenomenal.

I’ve been there for about a year, it’s been an eye opening experience. I love the company. I’ve been a WordPress fan and WordPress user, as I’m sure many of you are, for a long time.

So let me start off by saying that I’m not a developer, so if you want to have more technical discussions, we ca do that and I can try, but chances are, I will pump the question and get an answer for you, and can follow up later.

I’m on the business team, and my role is to kind of evangelize and run, lead our business development team in government, non-profit and political space.

So, throughout my career, I’ve worked with a lot of really cool innovators in Silicone Valley and in Washington DC and now up in New York City where I live, and i’ve been super impressed working in the government space.

I feel like we are still really early on in the evolution of technology and innovation but we’ve had just amazing strides over the last couple years in the reinvention of digital strategy, of open government and open source technology, and you know, working with people like Dan who you’ll hear from later and others across government. It’s just been a phenomenal experience.

That being said, I do still think that we’re still super early and that we’re on kind of the first wave, the first generations of the platform and the technology that you’ll see deployed into governments, and we’re obviously in a lot of ways, we’re riding a Drupal wave right now.

One of the things that I’ve heard a lot about in the last year, as I’ve begun to have more and more conversations is, that people are using WordPress as a blogging software and oftentimes behind a firewall for internal communications, and inter-agency communications.

But increasingly, now there’s a desire to use WordPress as a full CMS and to use it for top line websites and agency, projects and micro sites at all levels of government. It’s been really cool to see it, interesting conversations.

So what I want to do is take you guys through the WordPress Eco system and kind of re-introduce you to where WordPress is today in 2013, because I think we’re literally this year, in May, celebrating our 10th university.

So, it’s a really, we’re not grown up yet, but we have come a long way and there’s a lot of perception out there a that I want to work on resolving as we now get into our early adulthood.

So let me just take you through the slides. There’s three flavors of WordPress. There is the self-hosted, WordPress, open-source service which was founded about 10 years ago by Matt Mullenweg, who’s the founder of Automattic and also was the first lead developer for WordPress.

Anyone can go on to WordPress.org, download the open-source, free WordPress software. You can run it on your own servers, you can host it on any number of cloud hosts, Amazon, Rackspace, wp-engine, BlueHost, Remote, Go Daddy, all those, the web host companies that we have good relationships with.

And, WordPress.org, you really have complete control over the code, the codebase, the experience, the fees, the plugins, the accessibility, the third-parties, the technology you bring in.

So in that way it’s really a model framework for building anything from an agency blog or a small web site, a microsite all the way up to large sites like The New York Times, and CNN and I’ll show you some of those great examples after.

We always say with great power comes responsibility, working as a developer or working with a few developers, you can do great things, but it’s also easy to build a plane that you fly too fast. So a lot of times I’m talking with people about sort of picking and choosing which plugins they want and streamline themes and decluttering to make it the most efficient, fast, responsive website, as possible.

So that’s WordPress.org. WordPress.com is the largest WordPress site in the world. It’s one large ultimate site. As of today, I think we have about 45 million sites running on WordPress.com including many in government space, the political and nonprofit space.

Basically, it’s a saas model, software as a service. So we do all of the backend infrastructure, hosting, CDN, storage, backup, security pieces so what you really have to work with and deal with and think about is the front end, the design, and the content, and that’s, that’s something that I know that people working with limited budget constraints or limited resources in terms of development, that’s something that’s very good.

Often times, I’m working with cities and states that have great design teams, they know CSS and Javascript, but they don’t have a good background php or in the code base. So using WordPress.com has been a real asset to them.

The third bucket in this line of buckets is WordPress.com VIP. This is my team. So the VIP team is sort of the best of both worlds, WordPress.org and WordPress.com It’s a SaaS hosting and support model, for enterprise-level websites. I can show you some examples later, but we power like a huge amount of the media sites and the large websites you probably visit every day.

On WordPress.com VIP, we allow you to run your own code base, your own plug ins, but you have direct access to our developers and they can do code reviews to make sure everything you’re doing is safe and secure, and scalable.

Those are things that I’m going to touch on in a minute but those are kind of some of the main questions that i’m getting as I’m talking to folks in the government space.

Really quickly about Automattic, Automattic is basically the commercial arm, the parent company if you will, of WordPress.com. It was founded in 2005, by Matt Mullenweg, who you can see, if you look A-U-T-O- and the M-A-T-T-I-C that M-A-T-T is for Matt. We had all different kinds of products, and for those of you who are running WordPress right now or thinking about running WordPress in your agency, I really recommend you take a look at automattic.com to see all the suite of services.

We have Akismet, VaultPress, Jet pack, VideoPress, and Gravatar, and all these products are really plug and play features to WordPress ecosystem, and some of them are also stand alone products that can really help drive all different kinds of features for your website, so check that out.

We’re about 150 employees, we work all around the globe. I’m sitting in Brooklyn, New York, but my team is in Europe, Eastern Europe, Japan, Australia and all throughout America and Canada, it’s really interesting. And to note, we also don’t have company e-mail. We don’t do internal e-mail. We communicate all by a series of internal blogs that are all linked together and so it’s a super, kind of new-age company and the work that we’re doing reaches a ton of people. We reach about half a billion people every month.

We have some great investors, which you can see here, including The New York Times. Who’s one of our big users and partners.

So our core philosophy of WordPress is simple and elegant, but also really powerful and flexible. Which is kind of the driving measure with which we measure ourselves with our software. We want anyone from a local blogger anywhere in the world to CFPB.gov or Nasa or BOJ or the State Department or the White House or anyone to be able to come on and build something that scales to their needs.

We have a lot of flexibility, you know, plugins and themes and APIs, and all these things allow you to you take the base software and make it as robust as you need to.

And in this role of diminishing budgets, diminishing resources, that is where we’ve seen a lot of the adoption of WordPress come in. It’s fast and easy, but very powerful which we’ll go over in a minute. You’re very safe, very secure, and super scalable.

One of the key points also is that it’s open. It’s open-source, this is something that’s kind of the driving force behind not only our software that we built, but the company itself. We’re an open-source company and that’s how we’re able to work in this distributed way across the world and make it work.

We are strong believers in rapid iteration, we put out three major releases every year. Upgrading WordPress is super easy, and for those of you again who are running WordPress right now or are thinking about running WordPress in the near future, I really recommend that you take a look at the upgrades and updates.

I talk to people every day in the government space that are running old software and that introduces a lot of issues. So if you have questions about that, or need recommendations or best practices, definitely reach out to me, iIll give you my e-mail and I can help you with that.

We’re the most powerful CMS on the web. We power 17.9% of the entire internet is powered by WordPress.  60+ million sites, 100,000 new sites are joining our ranks every day. We just had a major influx, there are stories you can check out about some defection when Tumblr was bought by Yahoo. And now we’re getting a lot of that traffic over to WordPress.com, which is really exciting.

We have 25,000 plgugins, 15,000 themes, and more every day. We have an amazing core group that works on the wordpress.org team that helps to get and manage all the code base for the plug ins and the themes that come in to make sure there’s no vulnerabilities, that there’s no hacking, prospecting, to make a website vulnerable. So, it’s a huge community, but we’ve done a really great job of building it. There’s a ton of resources out there.

So, let me talk quickly about WordPress as an enterprise CMS. My biggest challenge coming into this job was, you know, WordPress powers the world, by far the largest CMS around, but when you look at the .gov space, the federal government and in some cases state, definitely not local, federal and state, there’s this perception that, yeah, we’re going to run our blogs on WordPress, but it’s not, it doesn’t scale to an enterprise CMS and obviously a lot of that  came from the decisions that the White House made in an earlier administration, to use Drupal, and a huge eco-system has been built up around Drupal in DC.

But let me just go through WordPress as an enterprise CMS, these are the majority of our VIP clients. These are the people that we’re building this and developing for every single day. On a CMS, you can customize your data and decide what everything looks like. We have multi-author responsibility where you can set rolls and permissions.

So, in some cases there are hundreds, or in some news rooms, thousands of people that are practicing the WordPress dashboard and that are leveraging, something that has evolved. There’s also multisite, which is the ability run multiple sites on on a single codebase within one organization. So we see this all the time in universities, at state government level, we’re working with GFA, as they’re scouting out a new project that’s super cool that involves WordPress multisite, but this could be an amazing application for your agency, you know, to kind of consolidate.

That’s one of the big things that I hear is that people are working in silos, not just across agencies, but across teams within agencies. They have different CMSs, they have no CMSs, they have a topline Drupal CMS, or a WordPress CMS but then everything else is on an old proprietary platform or no platform at all.

That’s one of the big things that I hear is that people are working in silos, not just across agencies, but across teams within agencies. They have different CMSs, they have no CMSs, they have a topline Drupal CMS, or a WordPress CMS but then everything else is on an old proprietary platform or no platform at all and WordPress multisite is definitely something that you guys should check out and that our team supports. If we saw more adoption of it, which we will over the next couple years of government, it would be an amazing thing for technology and innovation and also for cost savings obviously – it’s free.

All kinds of integrations that help power the enterprise CMS, APIs, plug-ins, all kinds of social extensibility, social plugins, plublicize, to Twitter and Facebook, and LinkedIn and Tumblr, and to push content in and out.

And then also, we have a VIP feature partner program, which we’ve basically gone out and curated the best technology companies and brought them into our fold. So all of our clients, and the people that are using WordPress.com VIP et increasingly into other products on WordPress.com, they get access to all these great tools.

And we also we have this great team of developers who’ve built this really great set of plug-ins that help with edit flow or for high octane news room, which could be amazing application for a government agency where there are different departments, different teams, different publishing, where instead of working inside Google Docs and on email, this is a way, I’ll give you an example with Edit Flow, a way to work directly within the Dashboard within the CMS to edit content and then push it to the, and then publish it to production.

WordPress is super scalable. Sometimes I’ll have calls with IT folks in government and they’ll say “well, I’m worried that it’s no scalable past a certain point. I read this here, or I saw this here.” A lot of it, if you Google and you start to get nervous or paranoid about these issues, a lot of those articles are from like 2004, 2005, 2006. We’ve come a long way.

WordPress.com, like I said, is the best example, but we have about 4 billion page views every month, we’re publishing 500,000 posts, 400,000 comments, and that’s all on one single installation of WordPress. So when I talk to government agencies that are scoping WordPress, I will bring our systems team on the phone with in-house IT folks and we’ll have a really great conversation about how to optimize that set up so that you can almost guarantee, 100% uptime, SLA, and all these things that I know the CIOs all are looking for when they’re scoping out new platforms.

From a security standpoint, that’s another thing that I hear about, I’m sure that that’s one of the biggest things, that, as web folks that you’re hearing as well “well WordPress isn’t secure”, and I hear this all the time even in conversations between WordPress and Drupal, people say “well, open source php, dynamic websites, these are not safe and secure things the government to be running and that’s totally, totally not true.

Oftentimes, the stories that you’ll see, where there’s been a hack or a vulnerability, or an issue, that comes from either the host, or from running an outdated version of WordPress, or some kind of call stripping error that a developer has introduced, but that’s why our team does expensive code reviews.

We review every line of code to make sure that all of our clients and all the people that are running WordPress at an enterprise level are really kind of inoculated from those types of issues. We’ve been vetted by all kinds of agencies and all the big players in IT security and we’ve gotten great feedback. So WordPress is a scalable, secure, platform, that can take you all the way up to where you need to go.

We’re mobile-friendly, mobile ready. The most exciting thing to me in the world is thinking about where the future is going, especially in the context of government, when it comes to mobile. The fact that, you know, we’re now putting all of this information and data, and giving it to people to develop apps and all kinds of integrations with healthcare and what Dan is doing at the CFPD, with consumer data. It’s so exciting and I think we’re super early on, but WordPress is completely mobile friendly.

You can make pretty much any theme responsive. We have great APIs, and we have themes that are mobile optimized. So you don’t have to have a separate track of mobile development and web development. It’s pretty much all one development package at this point.

Really quickly, a little bit more about VIP services just because I want to make sure that people know, if you are going to use WordPress or if you are using WordPress, there is a company, Automattic, that is behind the service and that could help support and scale and be a resource to you or to an agency partner or to a consultant.

We do this all the time where we step in and basically get a developer seat for self-hosted support and you can have unlimited access to our team of developers, who are really world-class, top WordPress and php developers and we will help you with best practices, code reviews, advice on plug ins, and all those kinds of things.

And then also, if you get to a point where you decide you want to host outside of your environment, WordPress.com can be a great option for you. And like I said, we do host a lot of government clients, and also Fortune 500 companies, and big media companies which I’ll show you in two seconds.

So really quickly, when you’re working with WordPress, your company, these are just some of the organizations using WordPress, The White House, DOJ, The House of Representatives, all throughout the Senate, DOD, State, CFDB, Library of Congress, EPA, and it’s growing every day. Everyday I have an exciting conversation with someone whose doing some kind of amazing innovation.

On the media front, we have our CNNs, CBS local, New York Times, Time, Tech Crunch, Venture Beat, all the big tech blogs, and it accounts for a lot of our traffic, but it also accounts for a lot of the energy and and the development resources that we put into our core products. If something is good for The New York Times, it’s going to be good for core software which is going to be good for you guys. It’s a really awesome eco-system and one that builds and builds and builds.

Let me close off real quick with this. We are doing a WordPress in Government half day workshop on June 13th in DC. It’s going to be really fun, a bunch of our partners, I think GSA will present,  agency partners and some interesting people, from Washington and around the Washington world. The Washington Post, which I don’t know if you guys know this, but The Washington Post actually serve a lot of their traffic through WordPress.

During the of 2012 campaign, I think at one point at the end, 85% of traffic was being served through a WordPress site, which was super exciting for us.  And now they’re official partners of ours and we’re working with them to help scale all these amazing products that they’re building. So if you want to come to WordPress in Government event, then let me know. Shoot me a note on e-mail, or here’s my email address and my Twitter handle. I would love to have you there.

Let me close out by saying, again that I’ve worked with some amazing people and I just applaud everyone who’s inside of government right now and innovating. It’s the place to be, and when I work and have meetings in Silicon Valley and in New York, everyone is trying to tap into the market of, you know, engaging with citizens, and I think you guys are on the front line of that, so I would love to be a partner and I would love to figure out ways for us to drive WordPress inside your agencies.

So please get in touch and I really appreciate your time.

Moderator: Thanks Peter. Before I pass it to dan, I wanted to remind everyone that we will take questions at the end and to please type your questions in the chat box. And we’ll also include, Peter, your email address in our follow up e-mail to attendees.

So if you didn’t get a chance to write it down, and have questions for Peter, we’ll send it.

So, as I mentioned our next presenter will be Dan Munz and he’s the product director for ConsumerFinance.gov.

Dan: Thanks a lot and thanks every body for spending a little bit of time this morning listening to Peter and I talk about WordPress and our experience with it.

I’m going to start off just with a little bit of background. First real quick about who I am and why on Earth you should listen to me about any of this stuff. As it was said, I’m the product director for consumerfinance.gov, at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which is DC’s newest federal start-up agency. I’m responsible for leading product development of the Bureau’s site consumerfinance.gov and some of our other digital products. And it’s important for me to say that I work with an amazing team of designers, developers, data analysts, project managers and new media strategists, who make all of this stuff I’m about to talk about go.

I’m a proud alumni of BGSA Center of Excellence in Digital Government. Before that, I spent about 5 years in political campaigns, non-profits and federal government, understanding how the modern web and the civic sector fit together and understanding the emerging technologies like WordPress make that happen and make it happen quickly.

Today, I’m going to give you a little bit of an overview of the Bureau and of consumerfinance.gov, talk a little bit about how we use WordPress and how it fits into our overall kind of web architecture. Give you a few thoughts about how to use it successfully and what to be careful of kind of from point of view and talk about a few sort of big, big hairy questions that keep us up at night.

So really quickly, a little bit of background on the bureau. If you want to trace our founding to kind of one sentiment or one thought, it’s probably this article published by then law professor Elizabeth Warren in the summer of 2007 called “Unsafe at Any Rate” in which she observed that it is impossible to buy a toaster that has a one-in-five chance of bursting into flames and burning down your house. But it is possible to refinance an existing home with a mortgage that has the same one-in-five chance of turning out to be much more destructive than you thought or that you were able to realize at the time.

And her insight then,  was there ought to be a federal agency regulator responsible for making consumer markets and consumer products work for consumers  and for responsible lenders and prevent exploding mortgages from making their way into the economy. That, as I said, was in summer 2007. A bunch of stuff happened to the American economy after that and in July 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act that created the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. By July 2011, we were about 100 or 200ish people. Here’s a picture of some of them. By July 2012, we were close to our current capacity, which is 1000-1100.

So we’ve had a pretty steep growth curve, and this is where we work. It’s at 1700 G. Street NW, if anyone’s in DC, come say hi, you can see our big friendly logo on the wall. That’s a little bit about the CFPB.

So now let me shift to talk about our site, consumerfinance.gov. It was launched in February 2011, five months ahead of schedule. It’s worth noting that the bureau itself didn’t actually open for business in a meaningful way until July 20011 and so for about 5-6 months, our website was not so much the website of a federal agency as the blog of a bunch of people who were building a federal agency. And we’ve had to evolve of the time, as a bureau matures and offer things it didn’t use to to offer, like complaint intake and consumer engagement regulations enforcement.

Consumerfinance.gov is the Bureau’s only digital property, we own digital property, and we’re actually pretty proud of that. When people ask how many websites we have, the answer is one, I’m personally pretty dedicated to making sure it is only ever one. Consumers are our core audience, like I said, we do regulation, we do enforcement, we do a lot of industry and other partner-facing work, but as far as our web brand is concerned, consumers are our core audience.

And to give you a sense of size, we do about 900,000 unique page views per month. We’re no WordPress.com, but we do okay. This is what our stack looks like. Going from the bottom up, we use Google Analytics to do our web analytics, we’re hosted on Amazon web services, we use Akamal as our content distribution network. At the top of the stack, there is WordPress, we also use Django, which is a pyhton-based web application framework to build a lot of stuff, but I’ll talk more about that in a second.

There are, to be sure, a lot of other technologies floating around in there that connect you to our our site. Apache obviously is in there, but as far as the technologies that surface to a user, this is the main stack.

So you notice at the top we have WordPress and Django there and this is a microcosm of the big CMS vs Framework questions. One thing I will say by the way is that I think Peter was maybe a little modest in talking about the question about can WordPress be a full-fledged CMS. Our experience is that absolutely yes it can.

It’s just uncontroversially true. There are things you have to do to make that happen successfully and there are things you can do to make it happen unsuccessfully, which I’ll talk about in a little bit.

Our experience so far has borne out the idea that WordPress manages content and is a good system for doing that. We use WordPress and Django together. We found that WordPress is a good fit for things that are standardized content types. So when you think about our blog, or our newsroom, or regulations, or testimonies, or speeches, or reports,  any of the many products we have that are sort of standardized content that we put out on a regular basis that we can manage in a sort of a bulk presentation way.

It has actually good content management user interface, UX designers sometimes referred to as the interface UX forgot and I agree they’re not always awesome and WordPress, or at least the self-hosted version which we use has a pretty solid back end. It also lets us cleanly distribute editorial workflow. There are plugins for that, but even WordPress out of the box has an ok version of this. And web application frameworks like Django, although there are CMSs for Django, tend to not do an awesome job at it.

So what we’re using Django for is really whenever we’re doing custom app development. Anything that’s highly interactive or highly database driven, or has a really complex taxonomy. Anything that depends a lot on search or complex navigation, or Ajax and things like that.

And we use it mostly for things that have relatively infrequent content updates, though there are certainly exceptions to that. I think the short way to think about this is we use wordpress when we want more people doing fewer things. We want more people around the Bureau to be able to create a blog post or create a press release, or repeatable simple things like that.

We use Django when we want fewer people to be able to do more things. So Django is the language that our designers and developers will use to build an application, and they can build a full application from bottom to scratch. It can be data viz oriented, have a lot of complex interaction. So it has a lot more flexibility and strength but you do have to be a developer to get in there and build with it.

To tackle kind of the main question that frames our time today, why choose WordPress, these are some of the reasons that I think at least we chose and why we continue to choose it. One is a basic level. You have a c (content) that needs m’ing (management). I remember a survey a while back when the federal, “hey everybody get rid of so many websites” order came about. Someone called all .gov sites and tried to count what CMSs they were all using, and I think 1,200 came back as none, which is not great.

So you know, WordPress is one of a family of software called CMS, and if you just have a bunch of content on a site that right now is just static HTML, you should get yourself a content management system period. It lets you get started really quickly and cheaply. Even the hosted version, for me to have hosting, it’s relatively simple to set up and install and get started. It’s really well documented in their documentation and online. So googling is really your help function.

Like i said, it has a pretty usable admin experience. It has a really nice syndication features. It makes it trivial to create an RSS feed content, there are plugins that let you really easily create a JSON API for the content. So WordPress has the potential to lend itself really nicely to being just one member of your web ecosystem.

Data in, data out are relatively clean. And one thing that is really important that I can’t stress enough.It was a robust well-managed community both on the kind of “I need tech support” side but also on the code side. There’s a lot of great development happening, there are a lot of plugins for core functionalities  that are relatively mature and really well maintained. So it’s relatively new, but it’s certainly past the point of being experimental technology, it’s absolutely usable.

The flip side of these things is kind of thing is that if you do choose WordPress, one thing that’s important to say is that WordPress is not natively a web application framework.And this is a statement to me that seemed obvious and I Googled it and it turns out to be a relatively controversial statement. It’s clear to me that WordPress, whatever its ambitions is not yet a full-fledged framework application. It is a CMS, and you know, I’m absolutely sure that it’s possible to build really complex web applications but it’s not what it does best. There are other frameworks that do it much better, much easier out of the box.

If you’re going to choose WordPress, you should really understand that the kind of four walls of what you’d consider to be content management, are really what you’re getting, at least that’s been our experience.

You still need designers and developers. It’s really important. It’s easy to think, I’m going to get WordPress and I’ll have a great website, but then you find out that, oh, well, you actually need designers to make it brand compliant, to do layout really well, you need UX professionals, to make sure your information architecture is right, so you understand what your content types are. You need developers to get the thing running, inspect plugins, make sure they work well, things like that.

So it doesn’t really free you from kind of needing a great design and dev team on staff. Some core cabilities are still maturing, the flipside of the robust plugin community,in some things I think of as core capabilities are kind of left to plugins, which, robust as they are, are still in development.

One great example of this is called Ramp, which is a plugin written for a use case that we certainly have which is moving from content from sort of a staging server to a production server, selectively in a way that doesn’t require to you delete your production database and start over. And you know, it’s a great plugin, it’s really incredible for us that it was written. But it doesn’t do some simple things like make removing content from production really easy. Or give you a unique ID that sort of syncs between staging and production.

So, that kind of stuff, you can run into it. And it’s only really when you realize that you need that functionality that you go “oh man, we need that” and then you kind of hope that the people who maintain that include that feature. To an extent, that’s true with all open source software. But we found that, in a few cases to be true of even things you’d think of as kind of core functionality.

I think this is another frame on Peter’s “with great power comes great responsibility” quote. It’s easy to do things right with WordPress, but it can be even easier to do things wrong. It makes it really trivial to upgrade the site, to add new plugins, so change your theme files and if you’re like me, php still looks like Matrix code to you.

It does make it potentially even easier to do things wrong. Before proceeding, some things have been really helpful for us, one is understanding your information architecture, and I mean seriously understanding it. And this is something you should do with any CMS, and any website.

But it’s especially true in a scenario where you have, at least for us, a hosted version of WordPress and you have to be pretty thoughtful about what kinds of content you’ll have, how they’ll relate to each other, what kind of taxonomies you’ll be able to use site-wide to be able to manage that content.

How you want content to show up in different places and it’s really important to kind of think out for your enterprise a step or two or three beyond where you are now. For us, we were in a major growth situation, where if you look at the Bureau, kind of 2 or 3 years into existence, the range that we offer the public are just totally different, and evolved every time, ’cause we’re growing so rapidly.

And so one challenge for us has been keeping our view of our digital architecture up-to-date with the architecture of the Bureau’s public offerings. So that’s really important.

A flip side of that, or a companion to that is understanding the enterprise. Understanding how you’re going to want content to be managed, who you want to have permissions to do that, what permissions you want them to have and reverse-engineered to the question of how you can configure that in a tech capability way.

One other thing I’d say is to think about search. This one area where I think WordPress, at least when we started using it, is not super strong and it’s, you know, for obvious reasons not up to the task of search across, example, WordPress and all of the stuff we keep in our Django-based apps.

So you’ll want to think about what your search solution is, we use USA search, which is a great one. There are things like Solr, which is a search library for Django, which is really great or for python.

The other tip I give is understand how your security shop thinks about open-source software. What Peter said earlier is absolutely right. Anyone who said that open-source software is inherently less secure or more secure than proprietary software is to my mind just flat wrong.

At the same time, using WordPress, does mean that, one way or another, if you,re doing it right, you’re going to have to take code that someone else wrote and run it our your servers. And that’s going to require you to at least understand and maybe have a few heart to heart conversations with your security shop to understand what’s the process for reviewing a plugin that we want to use, and the process for reviewing an upgrade.

It may turn out to be painless, or painful. If you dive into this without understanding how they’re thinking about that challenge, it’s almost certain to be painful.

So the next horizon issues for us, from a web strategy standpoint broadly, one is structuring content and taxonomies more consistently. This is kind of an issue I flagged earlier. Understanding how all the content we have relates to one another, and how kind of the information architecture that’s emerging can be reflected efficiently in the way we divide content on the back end. Something we’re always striving to do better but, it’s something that I think keeps us up at night.

Being smart about pushing reusable code blocks into modules or plugins. I think we’re learning all the time, about what kind of single purpose things we build, turn out to be enduringly useful and how we can push those into blocks of code or blocks of functionality that we an reuse.

And to me the biggest one is abstracting this question of templating to be platform agnostic.  More and more I think you see kind of really mature web organizations thinking about the engine that templates and serves sites to the public, being potentially really different from the engine used to manage and store content, kind of the database.

I think our kind of hypothesis, is that if we’re able to separate those functionalities and create a layer that pulls content from WordPress or from Django, or somewhere else and can serve it with the same consistent template, we’ll be in a really good position.

This is a particularly important issue for government, not only because you’re sometimes integrating multiple content management database structures, but also because occasionally, if you’re like us, you’re called on to integrate kind of a third party piece of software that has a public facing component into the site. And regardless of what kind of CMS you mostly use, it can be a real challenge to do that in a way that’s kind of brand consistent and well-integrated.

So we’re really actively thinking about investing in the capability to take the question of templating and sucking content out of somewhere and serving it onto the web in a really uniform way and really separating that from the core database stuff, where content is kept.

So that’s pretty much all I have to say, I hope that’s given you kind of overview of how we think about and use WordPress and how we think about managing web content and having better web properties generally. Like I said I really appreciate everyone on the call taking the time and I’m eager to take some questions.

Moderator: Okay, thanks Dan. We do have a couple of questions.

Both you and Peter mentioned security, would it be preferable to install WordPress on an intranet server, as opposed to using it as a third-party method?

Now I don’t know if Peter you want to address that or Dan or both of you?

Peter: It’s hard to say, depending on the use case is. The person with the question should definitely reach out to me and I get some more solid recommendations.

Dan: I mean the only thing I’d say is I’d go back to my point earlier that there’s not really and this is partly because I think Federal security shops are, while not new, not necessarily having standard out of the box procedures for reviewing open-source software, it’s hard to say there’s a preferable way to do it.The really preferable way to do it is have a conversation with your security team before you pick a direction to proceed in.

Moderator: Okay. You mentioned, Dan, that you obviously need developer and technical support to use WordPress. Can you elaborate relative to other CMSs, is it more, less, the same?

Dan: My guess is a little bit less than Drupal, although, I have to say I don’t have a ton of experience with Drupal, my understanding is that you know, partly because it was kind of born as a CMS, there’s a little bit more configuration complexity there to it. But if you think about the spectrum of things, if you think about something like WordPress.com, or any kind of hosted service, that’s where you really need the least developer support.

You still need design unless you’re building a website with no front-end, maybe you want your visitors to consume pure JSON, but if that’s not the case, you’ll need design. But in terms of dev and tech resources, anything hosted externally is the easiest solution. Anything hosted internally, if you want to do it professionally, there’s just going to be some level of having folks who can think about the architecture of the site, having it think about scalability, caching and serving and things like that. You’d be surprised at like the really dumb things that can happen if you don’t have folks like that around. Then, as I said, the top of the spectrum is frameworks ike — like pure web applications like Django and ruby on rails and things like that that are really purely application development frameworks and really, you know, anyone can get started but that’s kind of where a developer or designer just has to play really, a really dominant

Peter: And also, just to weigh in on that a little. One of the things I’ve been working on is really helping to identify resources, especially in and around the DC area. So talking with a lot of companies that do web development and bringing them up to speed on WordPress as an enterprise product, so, if, and there are some really great resources out there, so if you know you want to do something that is a little more complicated than the out of the box piece, let me know and I’m happy to connect you.

Also, as I said, part of what we do is supporting folks that are self-hosting, to be that developer resource. If you have someone that knows WordPress or php but doesn’t feel like they can extend it to the point where you need to get it, we can be kind of that bridge to help you in that way. I think to answer the fundamental question, all these things, when you’re talking about doing something that’s bigger than out of the box requires some level of expertise and that includes developers and designers. But for the most part, when I talk to people bout, deciding between WordPress and Drupal, and let’s just say Junla, it’s never a question of, this one needs nothing and this one needs something. It’s always a question of, where are the resources, and also what’s the long-term strategy. Like for example with Drupal, they do a once a year or once every ten month release period, or updates, and that oftentimes will lead to you needing to tear down the house and rebuild it more often, whereas WordPress is more iterative. And you can update as you go and theres a lot more backwards compatibility. And that’s the kind of thing we see a lot in conversations.

Moderator: Great, thanks. Could one of you actually show specifically what the back end looks like?I  don’t know Peter or Dan, who would be the best person. Peter, I can pass control back to you just so we can get a better understanding of how it works and how we can better use it.

Peter: Whoever had that question, there’s all kinds of resources, screenshots, screenshares online, so if this doesn’t answer all your questions, that will.

Moderator: Maybe Dan you could answer this question. With all the API work being done in Drupal, will it scale or work with WordPress?

Dan: I mean it’s a little bit tough to tell. It depends on the individual project, but in general, I think it’s really important to understand that one of the kind of main goals of API work generally is to make data transport really agnostic to these kind of platform questions. Depending on how, I mean it sounds like the question might be about content migration between Drupal and WordPress and operating them together. If the person who asked that question wants to drop a little clarifying note, that’d be great.

Part of the reason I think it’s good for everyone, both Drupal and WordPress, they focused pretty hard on making it easy to create APIs and build webpages on top of webpage stores, is that it doesn’t lock you in to any of those. Your data’s really portable, it’s reusable in web applications. So if I wanted to build a web application that pulled in my content from Drupal and my content from WordPress, inefficiencies aside, I could probably do that.

So, when you think APIs, you should think inter-operability, more or less no matter what. Like I said, I’m sure their fields look different, they’re stored differently, but in the abstract, that’s the answer.

Moderator: Great, thanks. So Peter, are you-all set?

Peter: I hope you guys can see it. Here’s the basic dashboard, if you see people walking around the world with WordPress, wp admin shirts on, all the nerds like me, this is kind of our core, the core tenant ofWordPress that has remained constant throughout the 10 years that we’ve had it.

Dan: Peter, can I just say that i love that you have two categories of blog posts, music and other.

Peter: Oh yeah, I’ve really extended this one greatly. Yes, so this just my own personal blog, so it doesn’t have any complexity to it, and I’ve seen The Washington Post’s dashboard and The New York Times’ Dashboard and it’s absolutely insane.

They build all these custom things for editing and edit flow, and permissions and all these types of things.

But very basic. Basically, here’s our, this is how you add a new post and a post is content-type, that you can even assign as, assign to different parts of your web site.

It can be media, it can be text, it can be anything. We have obviously taxonomy around tagging and so you can have robust search. This is the uploaders where you can add images and links and then have you, in your library, you have all of your uploaded content, and it can kind of practice a storage area for you and then you can click in and embed content, so that’s great for photos if you’re one to put beautiful HD photos, those kinds of things look great.

On the user front, this is something that may interest you guys. Say you have 30 people in your office who are assuming different roles and you want them to have different permissions, you can invite new users and you can change roles to be an administrator, editor, author, contributor, will then trigger access to different parts of the site, different controls of the site, which is a great feature, in an organization where there’s a lot of folks.

What I really recommend you do, because it’s free and it takes 10 seconds and it’s easy, is go to WordPress.com, sign up for free account, and just start to poke around, build your own little site and from there you can really start to play around. And as I said, it’s really that easy, to at least get started.

The stuff that Dan’s talking about, it’s all super interesting, the layers of framework that he’s put on top of it. Or to just get a basic site up and running that has pretty much all the full functionality that you would need to publish, it only takes a couple of minutes and then from there, the sky is really the limit. We also have great stats which I love checking. I’ll show you what a loser I am right now, but you can really see kind of all your stats here in one place. Not as good as google analytics, but it’s getting these. It’s pretty fun to watch.

One of the things that I definitely recommend you do too, if you’re running your own WordPress site is go to jetpack.me and install that plugin. It’s a way to bring a lot of the development of WordPress.com onto your self hosted site and in doing that, you get the chat functionality and other cool things to see and to try.

Moderator: Peter, can you limit specific roles to specific pages?

Peter: You can. There’s some stuff that you can do, definitely, and that’s something that we get a lot of questions about. So there’s definitely, there’s great documentation if you go to Google and type in WordPress Goals, there’s a link that I send around to people a lot that clarifies all the different pieces of the roles on WordPress.

Moderator: Is there any type of site that you wouldn’t recommend using WordPress, for example a transactional site or a data heavy site?

Peter: I don’t think I can recommend that you don’t. What we’re seeing how WordPress works at every level. Some of the stuff that Dan was talking about with heavy data table asks those kind of things,there might be integration that would make sense to explore.

But, we’ve done surveys of our user base and there’s a huge number of people that are running e-commerce and running full CMS and kind of doing full-fixture blogging sites and increasingly now using WordPress as a framework. I don’t think this is going to happen in government tomorrow, but it could be something down the road. And certainly, like the Washington Post is using it, using either the publishing piece of WordPress in the backend and a front-end solution, or vice versa and they’re using the front end of the solution and importing through a different type of back end. It just takes a lot of creativity and some developer lifting.

Dan: Just to add to that. I would frame the question just a little bit differently and say that for almost any type of site you want to build, the great thing about the web is that someone’s already built something like it already, and so there’s probably a tool that’s really great at it.

And so it’s hard for me, I mean at the end of the day it’s all code. It’s hard for me to think of a kind of site that you just absolutely couldn’t build with WordPress, especially it you extend it with the right technologies.

You should really kind of understand the kind of offering you want to build whether you’re building something very editorial, or something that’s focused on serving data and APIs in like a really high-volume scalable way. You know, there are technologies that are greater and better meant for it and that’s where I’d start.

It’s also worth understanding that the technology is really just one element. It’s really important to understand how the technology plus what kind of resources you have. If you have, you know, WordPress plus a bunch of amazing php developers, that might be a great choice to build a really kind of data-heavy, interaction-rich site. If you have WordPress, but you know, no developer help and you want to build something complex like that then it’s not a good choice.

A lot of platform choice hinges in parallel with the question of what kind of team you have to work on it.

Moderator: Okay, thank you, that’s actually all the questions we have and we’re just about at noon, so thank you both to Peter and Dan for taking the time, and thanks to everyone for listening. As a reminder, we’ll be sending a survey evaluation along with several resources and Peter’s contact information.

So thanks again everyone and have a great afternoon.

 

If you’re looking for information about government sites using WordPress, check out our spotlight on Building Government Websites with WordPress CMS or get in touch directly with the WordPress.com VIP team.

Thought Catalog on Building a Massive Open Contributor Network – Big Media & Enterprise Meetup NYC

James Ellis, Jameson Proctor and Matthew Spencer from Athletics  presented “Thought Catalog on VIP: Building a Massive Open Contributor Network” at the recent Big Media and Enterprise Meetup in New York City. Their presentation included their author permalink plugin that is now available on GitHub.

See the presentations from previous Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetups. For Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup groups in other cities, see the full list on VIP Events and join your local group. We have upcoming developer and superuser training near you.

Want more information about WordPress services for media or enterprise sites? Get in touch.

VIP Training Days in San Francisco & New York in November

In November we’ll be hosting VIP Training Days, our intensive, one-day, in-person training courses led by a team of WordPress.com VIP instructors, in both San Francisco and New York City.

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In each location, we’ll be offering our existing Developer Fundamentals I and Superuser courses, and our newest developer course, Site Security & Debugging. VIP Training Days courses are limited to no more than 20 people with each team of VIP instructors which ensures lots of hands-on learning and interaction.

  • Developer Fundamentals I — for beginner PHP developers & advanced PHP developers new to WordPress. A great review of WordPress fundamentals and best practices and the codebase, with a focus on themes and plugins.
  • Superuser — for site administrators, editors, and trainers for large or multi-author sites. A deep dive into the entire publishing process as well as managing users, comments, social integrations, mobile, and more.
  • Developer Fundamentals: Site Security & Debugging — for experienced WordPress developers. Attendees will learn how to think like an attacker and exploit the vulnerabilities before fixing them with security best practices and various debugging techniques.

These courses are suitable for both self-hosted and WordPress.com VIP sites/superusers/developers – the large majority of the material will focus on core WordPress functionality/features. You can read on below for more information about the other courses, or go directly to the event registration pages where each course is also explained in detail.

For current VIP clients & partners, there is a client discount available if you register before October 10th – please get in touch for the discount code. If you’re planning on sending two or more participants to VIP Training Days, please get in touch as well as we’d like to offer you a special group discount.

Register for VIP Training Days in November!

Current VIP clients & partners can contact us to be invoiced directly if preferred.

A special thanks to WordPress.com VIP Service Partner Voce Platforms (@VocePlatforms) for offering their offices for the New York training.

Be a part of the Big Media & Enterprise WordPress community in San Francisco and New York!

Be sure to join the Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup in San Francisco or the Big Media & Enterprise WordPress Meetup in New York City! Meetups happen regularly. The next meetup in San Francisco is November 4th, and the next one in New York City is December 9th!

More information about the VIP Training Days courses:

VIP Training Days: Developer Fundamentals I Training

Description

WordPress Fundamentals I is a day-long, intensive course meant to introduce PHP developers to programming for WordPress. Attendees should be familiar with WordPress as a tool, and have a working understanding of its general terminology. Proficiency with PHP is also a must, but no knowledge of the WordPress code itself is expected. This is a great course for developers looking to build sites which will scale to VIP levels, and write secure and scalable code.

Prerequisites

  • Proficiency with basic PHP development.
  • Awareness of WordPress as a platform, including common terminology such as a post, a page, widgets, and sidebars.
  • A local development environment running WordPress Trunk. We will provide a virtual machine ahead of time for participants who don’t have their own development environments, but they will be responsible for setting it up ahead of time.

Course Materials & Requirements

Each student will provide their own computer (laptop) for the course, with working wifi functionality. A lunch break and light lunch will be provided by WordPress.com VIP. Students should have a local working copy of WordPress trunk installed and tested prior to the training. To download trunk: http://wordpress.org/download/svn/

Curriculum Overview

  • Intro to WordPress core, SVN, and Trac, history and culture
  • Developer environment and debugging tools
  • WordPress Development Best Practices
  • Introduction to Plugins
  • Actions and filters
  • Introduction to Themes
  • The Loop & WP_Query
  • More on themes
  • …and more!

VIP Training Days: Developer Fundamentals Training: Site Security & Debugging

WordPress Fundamentals: Site Security & Debugging is a day-long, intensive course meant to improve WordPress developers’ understanding of advanced concepts. Attendees should be familiar with developing WordPress plugins and themes or should have attended our Developer Fundamentals I course.

We’ll cover the basics of writing secure code. Instead of just listing vulnerabilities, attendees will learn how to think like an attacker and exploit the vulnerabilities before fixing them. In the course of learning more about security, we will introduce various debugging techniques to help attendees find problems in the code faster.

Prerequisites

  • Proficiency with PHP development.

  • Awareness of WordPress as a platform, including common terminology such as a post, a page, widgets, and sidebars.

  • Proficiency with basic WordPress plugin and theme development – actions, filters, loading assets, main core APIs.

  • The latest version of VirtualBox: https://www.virtualbox.org/

Curriculum Overview

  • Security: common types of vulnerabilities

  • Security: exploiting and fixing open redirects

  • Security: exploiting and fixing XSS problems in HTML, JS, and CSS

  • Security: exploiting and fixing CSRF vulnerabilities

  • Security: exploiting and fixing SQL injection problems

  • Security: exploiting and fixing remote file inclusion attacks

  • Security: exploiting and fixing clickjacking attacks

VIP Training Days: Superuser Training

Description

In this course, you’ll learn how to manage and use the WordPress interface from a site owner’s point of view; as someone who will be managing multiple users, their permissions, and ultimately sharing knowledge with them about how to use WordPress to publish a great site with an active community and/or audience. We like to think of this course as our teachers teaching your teachers – those who will serve as the WordPress expert in an organization.

We’ll also do a deep dive into the publishing process so our superusers can teach their editors, authors, and contributors how to best use the WordPress interface. From creating and publishing posts to managing tags and categories, from mastering multimedia and images in articles, and bulk management of posts and pages, we’ll cover the entire publishing process from draft to done.

Prerequisites

Users should have a working (beyond basic) knowledge of the WordPress administration panel / backend. They should be managers, administrators, or editors of an existing or future WordPress site with multiple users.

Course Materials & Requirements

Each student will provide their own laptop computer (no tablets) for the course, with working wifi functionality. A lunch break and light lunch will be provided by WordPress.com VIP to all students. For the purposes of the course, students will be given access to a WordPress.com site. Users will be requested to create a WordPress.com username if they don’t have one, and this username will be submitted to the course instructor. To create a WordPress.com username: http://en.wordpress.com/signup/

Curriculum Overview

  • User Management: roles, permissions, and invitations
  • User Profiles: settings, preferences, and Gravatars
  • Comments: moderation, spam, and notifications
  • Creating & Publishing posts
  • Managing tags and categories
  • Mastering Media: images, galleries, and slideshows
  • Bulk management of Posts and Pages
  • …and more!

Register for VIP Training Days in November!

Current VIP clients & partners can contact us to be invoiced directly if preferred.

Have any questions? Get in touch.

The Dream Internship: Work at Automattic (Spring 2015)

Update: Applications are now closed.

Our company Automattic — which runs WordPress.com, Akismet, VaultPress, and many other services — is looking for a few stellar spring student interns, specifically to work with us on the WordPress.com VIP team.

WordPress.com VIP provides hosting and support for high-profile, high-traffic WordPress sites, including Time.com, FiveThirtyEight.com, qz.com, TechCrunch.com, Recode.net, NYPost.com, etc.

You’ll be working on a range of projects depending on your skills and passions, but here’s an overview:

Communications Intern: This internship is all about improving client communications. You’ll likely be writing case studies, interviews, launch posts and new feature posts for the VIP News site, in addition to helping organize our fall events.

Development Intern: This internship is all about making things. You’ll likely be working on WordPress plugins for large media companies, or working on core WordPress.com features and development.
Update: The Development Internship position is now filled. We will be accepting applications for our summer internship starting February.

Where will you be working you may ask? Anywhere! We are a distributed company and are happy if you work from wherever you are — as long as you have a good broadband connection. This paid internship runs 12 weeks between March 9th and May 29th, 2015, but we are flexible on the dates.

Interested? Complete your application by filling in the form below. In the space provided, introduce yourself and why you’d like to be an intern with our team. Be clear about what you’ve done and what you’d like to work on — for example, a killer plugin or integration, a feature improvement, a case study, etc. Students enrolled in a full-time or part-time undergraduate or graduate program with 6+ months left before graduation are encouraged to apply.

Send in your internship application by November 1st for consideration in the program. If you have any questions, please leave a comment and we’ll get back to you!

Applications are now closed.

Josh Betz is a former VIP intern who now works as a code wrangler. During his internship he worked on a VIP user management plugin and WordPress.com Enterprise.